Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for December 18, 2020.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

A NEW MISSIONARY

The new update on all the SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET social media platforms as more projects reviewed. A 3DS mission accomplished.

#DISCOVER,DEVELOP,DEPLOY.

RESEARCHERS UNCOVER BLIND SPOTS AT THE INTERSECTION OF AI AND NEUROSCIENCE

Is it possible to read a person’s mind by analyzing the electric signals from the brain? The answer may be much more complex than most people think.

NOVEL DEVICE LENSES FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS

,University of delaware
Professor Mark Mirotznik and others in UD’s Additive Manufacturing Technology Center are developing novel device lenses for wireless communications that could usher in a new wave of capabilities.

BUILDING MACHINES THAT BETTER UNDERSTAND HUMAN GOALS

In a classic experiment on human social intelligence by psychologists Felix Warneken and Michael Tomasello, an 18-month old toddler watches a man carry a stack of books towards an unopened cabinet. When the man reaches the cabinet, he clumsily bangs the books against the door of the cabinet several times, then makes a puzzled noise.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

NEW CONSTRAINTS ON ALTERNATIVE GRAVITY THEORIES THAT COULD INFORM DARK MATTER RESEARCH

While particle theories are currently the most favored explanations for dark mater, physicists have still been unable to detect dark matter particles in ways that would confirm or contradict these theories. Some theorists have thus been exploring new theories of gravity that clearly account for and explain the existence of this elusive type of matter. In order to obviate the need for dark matter, however, these theories should be aligned with cosmological observations gathered so far.

‘CHAOTIC’ WAY TO CREATE INSECTLIKE GAITS FOR ROBOTS

Researchers in Japan and Italy are embracing chaos and nonlinear physics to create insectlike gaits for tiny robots—complete with a locomotion controller to provide a brain-machine interface.

FAST WALKING IN NARROW CORRIDORS CAN INCREASE

COVID-19 transmission risk
Computational simulations have been used to accurately predict airflow and droplet dispersal patterns in situations where COVID-19 might be spread. In the journal Physics of Fluids, results show the importance of the shape of the space in modeling how virus-laden droplets move through the air.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

RESEARCH EXPLORES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NITROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE IN GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary study on a decade-long experiment (1997-2009) at the University of Minnesota found that lower nitrogen levels in soil promoted release of carbon dioxide from soils under high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and could therefore contribute to furthering rising atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change.

SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE DARK SIDE OF BIOMASS BURNING POLLUTION

Oxidized organic aerosol is a major component of ambient particulate matter, substantially impacting climate, human health and ecosystems. Oxidized aerosol from biomass burning is especially toxic, known to contain a large amount of mutagens that are known carcinogens. Inhaling biomass burning particles can also cause oxidative stress and a wide range of diseases such as heart attacks, strokes and asthma. Oxidized aerosol primarily forms from the atmospheric oxidation of volatile and semi-volatile compounds emitted by sources like biomass burning, resulting in products that readily form particulate matter. Every model in use today assumes that oxidized aerosol forms in the presence of sunlight, and that it requires days of atmospheric processing to reach the levels observed in the environment. Naturally, this implies that oxidized aerosol forms in the daytime and mostly during periods with plentiful sunshine, such as in summer.

AS SEA ICE DISAPPEARS, A GREENER AND BROWNER ARCTIC EMERGES

Arctic sea ice has been in steep decline over the past two decades. A study of tundra shrubs published today in the journal PNAS shows that as sea ice disappears, the Arctic is becoming both greener and browner.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

JAPAN’S SPACE AGENCY FINDS AMPLE SOIL, GAS FROM ASTEROID

Officials from Japan’s space agency said Tuesday they have found more than the anticipated amount of soil and gases inside a small capsule the country’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft brought back from a distant asteroid this month, a mission they praised as a milestone in planetary research.

ICE-RICH FLOW FEATURES IN MARTIAN SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE REVEAL EFFECTS OF RECENT CLIMATE CYCLES

A large, previously unrecognized reservoir of water ice on Mars is well preserved and formed within the past few million years, says a paper led by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Daniel C. Berman.

POWERFUL ELECTRICAL EVENTS QUICKLY ALTER SURFACE CHEMISTRY ON MARS AND OTHER PLANETARY BODIES

Thinking like Earthlings may have caused scientists to overlook the electrochemical effects of Martian dust storms.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

WEAK FORCE HAS STRONG IMPACT ON NANOSHEETS

You have to look closely, but the hills are alive with the force of van der Walls.

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP WIRELESS, ULTRA-THIN AND BATTERY-FREE STRAIN SENSORS THAT ARE 10 TIMES MORE SENSITIVE

A research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS), led by Assistant Professor Chen Po-Yen, has taken the first step towards improving the safety and precision of industrial robotic arms by developing a new range of nanomaterial strain sensors that are 10 times more sensitive when measuring minute movements, compared to existing technology

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment