Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for December 2, 2020.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for December 2, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

๐Ÿ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWS๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ–ฅ:

A STRATEGY TO TRANSFORM THE STRUCTURE OF METAL-ORGANIC FRAMEWORK ELECTROCATALYSTS

The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a chemical process that leads to the generation of molecular oxygen. This reaction is of key importance for the development of clean energy technologies, including water electrolyzers, regenerative fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries.

NEW SYSTEM OPTIMIZES THE SHAPE OF ROBOTS FOR TRAVERSING VARIOUS TERRAIN TYPES

So you need a robot that climbs stairs. What shape should that robot be? Should it have two legs, like a person? Or six, like an ant?

DISCOVERIES HIGHLIGHT NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR MAGNESIUM BATTERIES

Magnesium batteries have long been considered a potentially safer and less expensive alternative to lithium-ion batteries, but previous versions have been severely limited in the power they delivered.

UK’S SOLE HYDROGEN CAR MAKER BETS ON GREEN REVOLUTION

Hydrogen-powered car manufacturer Riversimple is hoping to steal a march on competitors ahead of Britain’s promised “green revolution” that would see petrol-powered cars banned within 10 years.

๐Ÿ—ž PHYSICS NEWSโš™โ™จ:

HITTING THE QUANTUM ‘SWEET SPOT’: RESEARCHERS FIND BEST POSITION FOR ATOM QUBITS IN SILICON

Researchers from the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) working with Silicon Quantum Computing (SQC) have located the ‘sweet spot’ for positioning qubits in silicon to scale up atom-based quantum processors.

IN SEARCH FOR DARK MATTER, NEW FOUNTAIN DESIGN COULD BECOME WELLSPRING OF ANSWERS

You can’t see it. You can’t feel it. But the substance scientists refer to as dark matter could account for five times as much “stuff” in the universe as the regular matter that forms everything from trees, trains and the air you breathe, to stars, planets and interstellar dust clouds.

AIR-FILLED FIBER CABLES CAPABLE OF OUTPERFORMING STANDARD OPTICAL FIBERS

The next generation of optical fiber could be a step closer as a new study has shown that fibers with a hollowed out center, created in Southampton, could reduce loss of power currently experienced in standard glass fibers.

๐Ÿ—ž EARTH NEWS๐ŸŒ:

BACTERIA IN IRON-DEFICIENT ENVIRONMENTS PROCESS CARBON SOURCES SELECTIVELY

When humans have low iron levels, they tend to feel weak, fatigued and dizzy. This fatigue prevents patients with iron-deficient anemia from exercising or exerting themselves in order to conserve energy.

DEEP-SEA VOLCANOES: WINDOWS INTO THE SUBSURFACE

Hydrothermally-active submarine volcanoes account for much of Earth’s volcanism and are mineral-rich biological hotspots, yet very little is known about the dynamics of microbial diversity in these systems. This week in PNAS, Reysenbach and colleagues, show that at one such volcano, Brothers submarine arc volcano, NE of New Zealand, the geological history and subsurface hydrothermal fluid paths testify to the complexity of microbial composition on the seafloor, and also provide insights into how past and present subsurface processes could be imprinted in the microbial diversity.

STABLE OCEAN CIRCULATION IN CHANGING NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN, STUDY FINDS

Ocean vertical structures are changing as a result of global warming. Whether these changes are in pace with the ocean circulation is unknown.

๐Ÿ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWS๐ŸŒช๐ŸŽ‡:

NEW TECH CAN GET OXYGEN, FUEL FROM MARS’S SALTY WATER

When it comes to water and Mars, there’s good news and not-so-good news. The good news: there’s water on Mars! The not-so-good news?

FAST-MOVING GAS FLOWING AWAY FROM YOUNG STAR CAUSED BY ICY COMET VAPORISATION

A unique stage of planetary system evolution has been imaged by astronomers, showing fast-moving carbon monoxide gas flowing away from a star system over 400 light years away, a discovery that provides an opportunity to study how our own solar system developed.

BRIGHTLY BURNING METEOR SEEN ACROSS WIDE AREAS OF JAPAN

A brightly burning meteor was seen plunging from the sky in wide areas of Japan, capturing attention on television and social media.

RESEARCHERS DISCOVER SOLID PHOSPHORUS FROM A COMET

An international study led from the University of Turku, Finland, discovered phosphorus and fluorine in solid dust particles collected from a comet. The finding indicates that all the most important elements necessary for life may have been delivered to the Earth by comets.

๐Ÿ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSโ›„โ˜ƒ:

ABNORMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN LOW ANGLE TWISTED BILAYER GRAPHENE

Materials scientists can control the interlayer twist angle of materials to offer a powerful method to tune electronic properties of two-dimensional (2-D) van der Waals materials. In such materials, the electrical conductivity will increase monotonically (constantly) with the decreasing twist angle due to enhanced coupling between adjacent layers. In a new report, Shuai Zhang and a team of scientists in functional materials, engineering, nanosystems and tribology, in China, described a setup for non-monotonic angle-dependent vertical conductivity across the interface of bilayer graphene containing low twist angles. The vertical conductivity enhanced gradually with the decreasing twist angle, however, after further decrease in the twist angle, the conductivity of the material notably dropped. The scientists revealed the abnormal behavior using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and credited the outcome to the unusual reduction in average carrier density originating from local atomic reconstructions. Atomic reconstruction can occur due to the interplay between the van der Waals interaction energy and the elastic energy at the interface, leading to intriguing structures. The impact of atomic reconstruction was significant on vertical conductivity for low-angle, twisted 2-D van der Waals materials; providing a new strategy to design and optimize their electronic performance.

REPLICATING SURFACES, RIGHT DOWN TO A FRACTION OF AN ATOM

The ability to replicate materials at the atomic level has attracted significant attention from materials scientists. However, the current technology is limited by a number of factors. Udo Schwarz, professor of mechanical engineering & materials science and department chair, has recently published two papers on research that could significantly open up what’s possible within this emerging field. His methods include a process that can replicate a surface’s features to details of less than one 10 billionth of a meter, or less 1/20th the diameter of an atom.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reservedยฉ2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment