Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for December 21, 2020.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for December 21, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

SUPPORTING, GROOMING FEMALE TECHIES

The recent SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET youtube upload caused and still causing a lot of accolade and appreciation.

Surf review from the STP social media platforms.

A MEMORY-AUGMENTED, ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK-BASED ARCHITECTURE

Over the past decade or so, researchers have developed a variety of computational models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs). While many of these models have been found to perform well on specific tasks, they are not always able to identify iterative, sequential or algorithmic strategies that can be applied to new problems.

SIMULATED SYSTEM COULD HELP DEVELOP BETTER ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, TREATMENTS FOR BRAIN DISORDERS

Getting computers to “think” like humans is the holy grail of artificial intelligence, but human brains turn out to be tough acts to follow. The human brain is a master of applying previously learned knowledge to new situations and constantly refining what’s been learned. This ability to be adaptive has been hard to replicate in machines.

SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIAL ANALYSIS MADE POSSIBLE WITH ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Studies on spintronics, which deal with the intrinsic spin of electrons and the field of electronic engineering, are actively conducted to address the limitations of the integration level of silicon semiconductors currently in use and to develop ultra-low-power and high-performance next-generation semiconductors. Magnetic materials are one of the most commonly used materials to develop spintronics devices such as magneto-resistive random-access memory (MRAM). Therefore, it is essential to accurately identify properties of the magnetic materials, such as thermal stability, dynamic behaviors and the ground state configuration, through the analysis of the magnetic Hamiltonian and its parameters.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

QUANTUM INSULATORS CREATE MULTILANE HIGHWAYS FOR ELECTRONS

New energy-efficient electronic devices may be possible thanks to research that demonstrates the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect—where an electrical current does not lose energy as it flows along the edges of the material—over a broader range of conditions. A team of researchers from Penn State has experimentally realized the QAH effect in a multilayered insulator, essentially producing a multilane highway for the transport of electrons that could increase the speed and efficiency of information transfer without energy loss.

NEW TYPE OF ATOMIC CLOCK COULD HELP SCIENTISTS DETECT DARK MATTER AND STUDY GRAVITY’S EFFECT ON TIME

Atomic clocks are the most precise timekeepers in the world. These exquisite instruments use lasers to measure the vibrations of atoms, which oscillate at a constant frequency, like many microscopic pendulums swinging in sync. The best atomic clocks in the world keep time with such precision that, if they had been running since the beginning of the universe, they would only be off by about half a second today.

ULTRACOLD ATOMS REVEAL A NEW TYPE OF QUANTUM MAGNETIC BEHAVIOR

A new study illuminates surprising choreography among spinning atoms. In a paper appearing in the journal Nature, researchers from MIT and Harvard University reveal how magnetic forces at the quantum, atomic scale affect how atoms orient their spins.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

SECRET OF AUSTRALIA’S VOLCANOES REVEALED IN NEW STUDY

ustralia’s east coast is littered with the remnants of hundreds of volcanoes—the most recent just a few thousand years old—and scientists have been at a loss to explain why so many eruptions have occurred over the past 80 million years.

NEW STUDY REDEFINES UNDERSTANDING OF WHERE ICEBERGS PUT MELTWATER INTO THE SOUTHERN OCEAN

Some icebergs that break off of Antarctica are massive—the size of New York City—but previously these floating cities of freshwater were largely ignored in climate models. A new study by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) has provided the first-of-its-kind model for how these icebergs decay as they drift around the frozen continent.

EXPECT FEWER, BUT MORE DESTRUCTIVE LANDFALLING TROPICAL CYCLONES

A study based on new high-resolution supercomputer simulations, published in this week’s issue of the journal Science Advances, reveals that global warming will intensify landfalling tropical cyclones of category 3 or higher in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, while suppressing the formation of weaker events.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

UNIQUE PREDICTION OF ‘MODIFIED GRAVITY’ CHALLENGES DARK MATTER THEORY

An international group of scientists, including Case Western Reserve University Astronomy Chair Stacy McGaugh, has published research contending that a rival idea to the popular dark matter hypothesis more accurately predicts a galactic phenomenon that appears to defy the classic rules of gravity.

CHINA PREPARES FOR RETURN OF SPACECRAFT WITH MOON SAMPLES

Chinese ground crews are standing by for the landing of the first new samples of rocks and soil from the moon in more than 40 years.

DARK STORM ON NEPTUNE REVERSES DIRECTION, POSSIBLY SHEDDING A FRAGMENT

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope watched a mysterious dark vortex on Neptune abruptly steer away from a likely death on the giant blue planet.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

PHYSICISTS SOLVE GEOMETRICAL PUZZLE IN ELECTROMAGNETISM

A team of scientists have solved the longstanding problem of how electrons move together as a group inside cylindrical nanoparticles.

COLORFUL, MAGNETIC JANUS BALLS COULD HELP FOIL COUNTERFEITERS

Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny “Janus balls” that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which could be verified with an ordinary magnet, the researchers say.

A NEW METHOD FOR THE FUNCTIONALIZATION OF GRAPHENE

An international research team involving Professor Federico Rosei of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has demonstrated a novel process to modify the structure and properties of graphene. This chemical reaction, known as photocycloaddition, modifies the bonds between atoms using ultraviolet light. The results of the study were recently published in the prestigious journal Nature Chemistry.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment