Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for December 3, 2020.

by OluwaShab


Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for December 3, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

ENGINEERS COMBINE LIGHT AND SOUND TO SEE UNDERWATER

Stanford University engineers have developed an airborne method for imaging underwater objects by combining light and sound to break through the seemingly impassable barrier at the interface of air and water.

SHRINKING MASSIVE NEURAL NETWORKS USED TO MODEL LANGUAGE

You don’t need a sledgehammer to crack a nut.

TEACHING COMPUTERS THE MEANING OF SENSOR NAMES IN SMART HOMES

The UPV/EHU’s IXA group has use natural language processing techniques to overcome one of the major difficulties associated with smart homes, namely that the systems developed to infer activities in one environment do not work when they are applied to a different one, because both the sensors and the activities are different. The group has come up with the innovative idea of using words to represent the activation of both sensors and human activity.

SELECTING BEST MICROALGAE FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION

Microalgae are a promising source of energy to replace fossil fuels, as they have several advantages over conventional crops used for commercial biodiesel. Microalgae have a shorter lifecycle and they can be developed in environments unfit for agriculture, so they are not competing with food crops for resources.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

NEXT STEP IN SIMULATING THE UNIVERSE

Computer simulations have struggled to capture the impact of elusive particles called neutrinos on the formation and growth of the large-scale structure of the universe. But now, a research team from Japan has developed a method that overcomes this hurdle.

SCIENTISTS SOLVE BIG LIMITATION OF STRATOSPHERIC BALLOON PAYLOADS

Nearly all photons emitted after the Big Bang are now visible only at far-infrared wavelengths. This includes light from the cold universe of gas and dust from which stars and planets form, as well as faint signals from distant galaxies tracing the universe’s evolution to today.

A Possible Way To Measure Ancient Rate Of Cosmic Ray Strikes Using ‘paleo-detectors’

An international team of researchers has proposed a way to indirectly measure the rate of cosmic rays striking the Earth over millions of years. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, they suggest using the imprints made by atmospheric neutrinos in so-called “paleo-detectors”—natural minerals expressing damage tracks resulting from nuclear recoils.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

EXAMINING CLIMATE EFFECTS OF REGIONAL NUCLEAR EXCHANGE

A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers has found that the global climatic consequences of a regional nuclear weapons exchange could range from a minimal impact to more significant cooling lasting years.

WHAT WILL THE CLIMATE BE LIKE WHEN EARTH’S NEXT SUPERCONTINENT FORMS?

Long ago, all the continents were crammed together into one large land mass called Pangea. Pangea broke apart about 200 million years ago, its pieces drifting away on the tectonic plates—but not permanently. The continents will reunite again in the deep future. And a new study, which will be presented December 8 during an online poster session at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union, suggests that the future arrangement of this supercontinent could dramatically impact the habitability and climate stability of Earth. The findings also have implications for searching for life on other planets.

COST OF PLANTING, PROTECTING TREES TO FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE COULD JUMP

Planting trees and preventing deforestation are considered key climate change mitigation strategies, but a new analysis finds the cost of preserving and planting trees to hit certain global emissions reductions targets could accelerate quickly.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

HUGE PUERTO RICO RADIO TELESCOPE, ALREADY DAMAGED, COLLAPSES

A huge, already damaged radio telescope in Puerto Rico that has played a key role in astronomical discoveries for more than half a century completely collapsed on Tuesday.

AUSTRALIAN TELESCOPE CREATES A NEW ATLAS OF THE UNIVERSE

The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), developed and operated by Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, mapped approximately three million galaxies in just 300 hours.

CHINESE PROBE LANDS ON MOON TO GATHER LUNAR SAMPLES

China landed a probe on the Moon on Tuesday, said Beijing’s space agency, which aims to bring back to Earth the first lunar samples in four decades.

3-D PRINT YOUR OWN MARS ROVER WITH EXOMY

Europe’s Rosalind Franklin ExoMars rover has a younger ‘sibling’ – ExoMy. The blueprints and software for this mini-version of the full-size Mars explorer are available for free so that anyone can 3-D print, assemble and program their own ExoMy.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

VIRUS-LIKE PROBES COULD HELP MAKE RAPID COVID-19 TESTING MORE ACCURATE, RELIABLE

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new and improved probes, known as positive controls, that could make it easier to validate rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for COVID-19 across the globe.

GRAPHENE: THE BUILDING BLOCK FOR SUSTAINABLE CITIES

Innovation in advanced materials offers the disruptive potential to transform the way we build our future cities—and make them greener and smarter.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment