Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 03, 2021.

116 views

JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR QUICK UPDATES ONLY

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 03, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

USING AUVS TO CONTROL THE OUTBREAK OF CROWN-OF-THORNS STARFISH IN AUSTRALIA’S GREAT BARRIER REEF

Over the past few decades, people around the world have been dealing with a vast variety of environmental threats. In Australia, these include risks associated with the deterioration and destruction of aquatic plants, animals and other organisms that inhabit surrounding seas and oceans.

THREADS THAT SENSE HOW AND WHEN YOU MOVE? NEW TECHNOLOGY MAKES IT POSSIBLE

Engineers at Tufts University have created and demonstrated flexible thread-based sensors that can measure movement of the neck, providing data on the direction, angle of rotation and degree of displacement of the head. The discovery raises the potential for thin, inconspicuous tatoo-like patches that could, according to the Tufts team, measure athletic performance, monitor worker or driver fatigue, assist with physical therapy, enhance virtual reality games and systems, and improve computer generated imagery in cinematography. The technology, described today in Scientific Reports, adds to a growing number of thread-based sensors developed by Tufts engineers that can be woven into textiles, measuring gases and chemicals in the environment or metabolites in sweat.

MACHINE LEARNING TO PREDICT THE PERFORMANCE OF ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS

Imagine looking for the optimal configuration to build an organic solar cell made from different polymers. How would you start? Does the active layer need to be very thick, or very thin? Does it need a large or a small amount of each polymer?

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

SOLVATION-DRIVEN ELECTROCHEMICAL ACTUATION

In a new study led by Institute Professor Maurizio Porfiri at NYU Tandon, researchers showed a novel principle of actuation—to transform electrical energy into motion. This actuation mechanism is based on solvation, the interaction between solute and solvent molecules in a solution. This phenomenon is particular important in water, as its molecules are polar: oxygen attracts electrons more than hydrogen, such that oxygen has a slightly negative charge and hydrogen a slightly positive one. Thus, water molecules are attracted by charged ions in solution, forming shells around them. This microscopic phenomenon plays a critical role in the properties of solutions and in essential biological processes such as protein folding, but prior to this study there was no evidence of potential macroscopic mechanical consequences of solvation.

NEW STUDY INVESTIGATES PHOTONICS FOR ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND NEUROMORPHIC COMPUTING

Scientists have given a fascinating new insight into the next steps to develop fast, energy-efficient, future computing systems that use light instead of electrons to process and store information—incorporating hardware inspired directly by the functioning of the human brain.

BY CHANGING THEIR SHAPE, SOME BACTERIA CAN GROW MORE RESILIENT TO ANTIBIOTICS

New research led by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Physics Shiladitya Banerjee demonstrates how certain types of bacteria can adapt to long-term exposure to antibiotics by changing their shape. The work was published in the journal Nature Physics.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

STUDY REVEALS NEW CLUES ABOUT MT. EVEREST’S DEADLIEST AVALANCHE

On the afternoon of April 15, 2015, an earthquake rocked the Himalayas, causing widespread death and damage across Nepal, India and Tibet. The magnitude 7.8 quake—the strongest ever recorded in the region—rattled glaciers and ice falls along a ridge just to the west of Mount Everest, sending an avalanche of ice and snow hurtling towards the base camp below. When the snow settled, 15 were dead and scores more were injured in what would become the deadliest day on the world’s highest mountain.

ANCIENT RIVERS REVEAL MULTIPLE SAHARA DESERT GREENINGS

Large parts of the Sahara Desert were green thousands of years ago, evidenced by prehistoric engravings in the desert of giraffes, crocodiles and a stone-age cave painting of humans swimming. Recently, more detailed insights were gained from a combination of sediment cores extracted from the Mediterranean Sea and results from climate computer modeling, which an international research team, including University of Hawai’i at Mānoa oceanography researcher Tobias Friedrich, examined for the first time.

ARCTIC WARMING AND DIMINISHING SEA ICE ARE INFLUENCING THE ATMOSPHERE

The researchers of the Institute for Atmospheric and Earth system research at the University of Helsinki have investigated how atmospheric particles are formed in the Arctic. Until recent studies, the molecular processes of particle formation in the high Arctic remained a mystery.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

COULD GAME THEORY HELP DISCOVER INTELLIGENT ALIEN LIFE?

New research from the University of Manchester suggests using a strategy linked to cooperative game playing known as ‘game theory’ in order to maximize the potential of finding intelligent alien life.

ExoMars Orbiter’s 20,000th Image

The CaSSIS camera onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has captured its 20,000th image of Mars.

ARIANE 6 UPPER STAGE HEADS FOR HOT-FIRING TESTS

The first complete upper stage of Europe’s new Ariane 6 launch vehicle has left ArianeGroup in Bremen and is now on its way to the DLR German Aerospace Center in Lampoldshausen, Germany. Hot firing tests performed in near-vacuum conditions, mimicking the environment in space, will provide data to prove its readiness for flight.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

DIRECT COHERENT MULTI-INK PRINTING OF FABRIC SUPERCAPACITORS

Fiber-shaped supercapacitors are a desirable high-performance energy storage technology for wearable electronics. The traditional method for device fabrication is based on a multistep approach to construct energy devices, which can present challenges during fabrication, scalability and durability. To overcome these restrictions, Jingxin Zhao and a team of scientists in physics, electrochemical energy, nanoscience, materials, and chemical engineering in China, the U.S., and Singapore, developed an all-in-one coaxial fiber-shaped asymmetric supercapacitor (FASC) device. The team used direct coherent multi-ink writing, three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology by designing the internal structure of the coaxial needles and regulating the rheological property and feed rates of the multi-ink. The device delivered a superior areal energy and power density with outstanding mechanical stability. The team integrated the fiber-shaped asymmetric supercapacitor (FASC) with mechanical units and pressure sensors to realize high performance and self-powered mechanical devices to monitor systems. The work is now published on Science Advances.

enquires:[email protected]
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

DOWNLOAD MP3/ZIP

You may also like

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: