Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 08, 2021.

154 views

JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR QUICK UPDATES ONLY

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 08, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

ZOOMBOMBING’ RESEARCH SHOWS LEGITIMATE MEETING ATTENDEES CAUSE MOST ATTACKS

Most zoombombing incidents are “inside jobs” according to a new study featuring researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

LOAD-REDUCING BACKPACK POWERS ELECTRONICS BY HARVESTING ENERGY FROM WALKING

Hikers, soldiers and school children all know the burden of a heavy backpack. But now, researchers have developed a prototype that not only makes loads feel about 20% lighter, but also harvests energy from human movements to power small electronics. The new backpack, reported in ACS Nano, could be especially useful for athletes, explorers and disaster rescuers who work in remote areas without electricity, the researchers say.

SCIENTISTS PROPOSE NEW WAY TO DETECT EMOTIONS USING WIRELESS SIGNALS

A novel artificial intelligence (AI) approach based on wireless signals could help to reveal our inner emotions, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

RESEARCHERS DEMONSTRATE THE POTENTIAL OF A NEW QUANTUM MATERIAL FOR CREATING TWO SPINTRONIC TECHNOLOGIES

Over the past decade or so, physicists and engineers have been trying to identify new materials that could enable the development of electronic devices that are faster, smaller and more robust. This has become increasingly crucial, as existing technologies are made of materials that are gradually approaching their physical limits.

DISCOVERIES AT THE EDGE OF THE PERIODIC TABLE: FIRST EVER MEASUREMENTS OF EINSTEINIUM

Since element 99—einsteinium—was discovered in 1952 at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) from the debris of the first hydrogen bomb, scientists have performed very few experiments with it because it is so hard to create and is exceptionally radioactive. A team of Berkeley Lab chemists has overcome these obstacles to report the first study characterizing some of its properties, opening the door to a better understanding of the remaining transuranic elements of the actinide series.

‘GHOST PARTICLE’ ML MODEL PERMITS FULL QUANTUM DESCRIPTION OF THE SOLVATED ELECTRON

The behavior of the solvated electron e-aq has fundamental implications for electrochemistry, photochemistry, high-energy chemistry, as well as for biology—its nonequilibrium precursor is responsible for radiation damage to DNA—and it has understandably been the topic of experimental and theoretical investigation for more than 50 years.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

STANDARD WATER TREATMENT TECHNIQUE REMOVES AND INACTIVATES AN ENVELOPED VIRUS

Enveloped viruses have been detected in raw sewage and sludge, but scientists still don’t fully understand the fate and infectivity of these viruses during water purification at treatment plants. Now, researchers reporting in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology have discovered that a standard water treatment technique, called iron (III) coagulation, and its electrically driven counterpart, iron (0) electrocoagulation, can efficiently remove and inactivate a model enveloped virus.

THE ARCTIC OCEAN WAS COVERED BY A SHELF ICE AND FILLED WITH FRESHWATER

The Arctic Ocean was covered by up to 900-meter-thick shelf ice and was filled entirely with freshwater at least twice in the last 150,000 years. This surprising finding, reported in the latest issue of the journal Nature, is the result of long-term research by scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the MARUM. With a detailed analysis of the composition of marine deposits, the scientists could demonstrate that the Arctic Ocean as well as the Nordic Seas did not contain sea-salt in at least two glacial periods. Instead, these oceans were filled with large amounts of freshwater under a thick ice shield. This water could then be released into the North Atlantic in very short periods of time. Such sudden freshwater inputs could explain rapid climate oscillations for which no satisfying explanation had been previously found.

IS THIS THE END OF THE A-68A ICEBERG?

Satellite images have revealed that the once colossal A-68A iceberg has had yet another shattering experience. Several large cracks were spotted in the berg last week and it has since broken into multiple pieces. These little icebergs could indicate the end of A-68A’s environmental threat to South Georgia.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

EVIDENCE FOR SUBSTANCE AT LIQUID-GAS BOUNDARY ON EXOPLANET WASP-31B

One of the properties that make a planet suitable for life is the presence of a weather system. Exoplanets are too far away to directly observe this, but astronomers can search for substances in the atmosphere that make a weather system possible. Researchers from SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and the University of Groningen have now found evidence on exoplanet WASP-31b for chromium hydride, which at the corresponding temperature and pressure is on the boundary between liquid and gas. The study is published in Astronomy & Astrophysics.

AT COSMIC NOON, PUFFY GALAXIES MAKE STARS FOR LONGER

Massive galaxies with extra-large extended “puffy” disks produced stars for longer than their more compact cousins, new modeling reveals.

NASA’S PERSEVERANCE PAYS OFF BACK HOME

Even as the Perseverance rover approaches Mars, technology on board is paying off on Earth.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

VISUALISING ATOMIC STRUCTURE AND MAGNETISM OF 2-D MAGNETIC INSULATORS

NUS scientists have demonstrated a general approach for characterizing the atomic structure and electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2-D) magnetic insulators using scanning-tunneling microscopy.

FROM RUST TO RICHES: COMPUTING GOES GREEN—OR IS THAT BROWN?

Current silicon-based computing technology is energy-inefficient. Information and communications technology is projected to use over 20% of global electricity production by 2030. So finding ways to decarbonise technology is an obvious target for energy savings. Professor Paolo Radaelli from Oxford’s Department of Physics, working with Diamond Light Source, the U.K.”s national synchrotron, has been leading research into more efficient alternatives to silicon. His group’s surprising findings are published in Nature in an article titled “Antiferromagnetic half-skyrmions and bimerons at room temperature.” Some of the antiferromagnetic textures they have found could emerge as prime candidates for low-energy antiferromagnetic spintronics at room temperature.

NANOTECH PLASTIC PACKAGING COULD LEACH SILVER INTO SOME TYPES OF FOODS AND BEVERAGES

Antimicrobial packaging is being developed to extend the shelf life and safety of foods and beverages. However, there is concern about the transfer of potentially harmful materials, such as silver nanoparticles, from these types of containers to consumables. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces illustrate that silver embedded in an antimicrobial plastic can leave the material and form nanoparticles in foods and beverages, particularly in sweet and sugary ones

enquires:[email protected]
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

DOWNLOAD MP3/ZIP

You may also like

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: