Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 09, 2021.

by OluwaShab
169 views

DOWNLOAD NOW

JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR QUICK UPDATES ONLY

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 09, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

ALL DOINGS ON GOD.

The decisions and precisions.

Seems morse writeup,more enlightenment on the SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET social media platforms.

NEW WINDOW SYSTEM CUTS SOUND LEVELS BY 26 DECIBELS, ACHIEVES FOUR TIMES BETTER VENTILATION

Home owners, especially those in noisy districts, can look forward to greater living comfort with a new invention by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) School of Design and Environment (SDE) that reduces outdoor noise and improves indoor ventilation.

RESEARCHERS CREATE ORIGAMI-INSPIRED SATELLITE ANTENNAS THAT CAN SELF-FOLD

As humankind steps into new frontiers in space exploration, satellites and space vehicles will need to pack more cargo for the long haul. However, certain items, like dish antennas used for wireless communication, pose a challenge since they cannot be very densely packed for flight because of their signature bowl shape.

CARBON DIOXIDE REMOVAL FROM THE ATMOSPHERE USING SUSTAINABLE ENERGY

Much work is taking place on methods for capturing CO2 from the atmosphere to combat climate change. In addition to existing methods that use toxic solvents, electrochemical techniques that can work with sustainable electricity are now becoming available. The TU Delft research group led by David Vermaas worked together with Wetsus and Caltech to analyze these sustainable technologies for CO2 removal, and compared them for the first time. The researchers also described which methods show the most potential for making large-scale CO2 removal possible. Their paper on this was published recently in the scientific journal Energy & Environmental Science.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

SCIENTISTS USE TRILAYER GRAPHENE TO OBSERVE MORE ROBUST SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

In 2018, the physics world was set ablaze with the discovery that when an ultrathin layer of carbon, called graphene, is stacked and twisted to a “magic angle,” that new double layered structure converts into a superconductor, allowing electricity to flow without resistance or energy waste. Now, in a literal twist, Harvard scientists have expanded on that superconducting system by adding a third layer and rotating it, opening the door for continued advancements in graphene-based superconductivity.

FLUID DYNAMICS OF COVID-19 AIRBORNE INFECTION SUGGESTS URGENT DATA FOR A SCIENTIFIC DESIGN OF SOCIAL DISTANCING

Infection by COVID-19 is largely caused by airborne transmission, a phenomenon that has rapidly attracted a great deal of attention from the scientific community. The SARS-CoV-2 virus hosted in different tracts of the respiratory system is emitted as we breathe, speak or sing or through more violent expulsions like coughing or sneezing. In these common actions, people emit thousands or even millions of small droplets of saliva acting as a vector for the virus. Given that the disease travels on respiratory droplets, social distancing is of paramount importance to limit the spread. Indeed, droplets are heavier than air, and sooner or later, they fall to the ground, which will tame their infectious potential.

NEW QUANTUM RECEIVER THE FIRST TO DETECT ENTIRE RADIO FREQUENCY SPECTRUM

A new quantum sensor can analyze the full spectrum of radio frequency and real-world signals, unleashing new potentials for soldier communications, spectrum awareness and electronic warfare.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

CALIFORNIA’S RAINY SEASON STARTING NEARLY A MONTH LATER THAN IT DID 60 YEARS AGO

The start of California’s annual rainy season has been pushed back from November to December, prolonging the state’s increasingly destructive wildfire season by nearly a month, according to new research. The study cannot confirm the shift is connected to climate change, but the results are consistent with climate models that predict drier autumns for California in a warming climate, according to the authors.

GLOBAL WARMING FOUND TO BE CULPRIT FOR FLOOD RISK IN PERUVIAN ANDES, OTHER GLACIAL LAKES

As the planet warms, glaciers are retreating and causing changes in the world’s mountain water systems. For the first time, scientists at the University of Oxford and the University of Washington have directly linked human-induced climate change to the risk of flooding from a glacial lake known as one of the world’s greatest flood risks.

ANTARCTIC LAVA YIELDS CLUES TO EARTH’S PAST MAGNETIC FIELD

The movement of molten metals in Earth’s outer core generates a vast magnetic field that protects the planet from potentially harmful space weather. Throughout Earth’s history, the structure of the magnetic field has fluctuated. However, data suggest that averaged over sufficient time, the field may be accurately approximated by a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) field—the magnetic field that would result from a bar magnet centered within Earth and aligned along its axis of rotation.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

POSSIBLE DETECTION OF HYDRAZINE ON SATURN’S MOON RHEA

In a new report on Science Advances, Mark Elowitz, and a team of scientists in physical sciences, optical physics, planetary science and radiation research in the U.S., U.K., India, and Taiwan, presented the first analysis of far-ultraviolet reflectance spectra of regions on Rhea’s leading and trailing hemispheres—as collected by the Cassini ultraviolet imaging spectrograph during targeted flybys. In this work, they specifically aimed to explain the unidentified broad absorption feature centered near 184 nanometers of the resulting spectra. Using laboratory measurements of the UV spectroscopy of a set of molecules, Elowitz et al. found a good fit to Rhea’s spectra with both hydrazine monohydrate and several chlorine-containing molecules. They showed hydrazine monohydrate to be the most plausible candidate to explain the absorption feature at 184 nm. Hydrazine was also a propellant in Cassini’s thrusters, however, in this instance, the thrusters were not used during icy satellite flybys and therefore the signal was assumed to not rise from spacecraft fuel. The scientists then detailed how hydrazine monohydrate may be chemically produced on icy surfaces.

DISTANT ‘BABY’ BLACK HOLES SEEM TO BE MISBEHAVING—AND EXPERTS ARE PERPLEXED

Radio images of the sky have revealed hundreds of “baby” and supermassive black holes in distant galaxies, with the galaxies’ light bouncing around in unexpected ways.

JAPAN SCIENTISTS TO STUDY SOURCE OF HIGH HEAT ON ASTEROID

Japanese space experts said Thursday they will examine soil samples brought back from a distant asteroid in an attempt to find the source of heat that altered the celestial body, in their search for clues to the origin of the solar system and life on Earth.

PROPELLING SATELLITES INTO THE FUTURE

Candidate ‘green’ satellite propellants within a temperature-controlled incubator, undergoing heating as a way to simulate the speeding up of time.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

NEWLY DISCOVERED GRAPHENE PROPERTY COULD IMPACT NEXT-GENERATION COMPUTING

MIT researchers and colleagues have discovered an important—and unexpected—electronic property of graphene, a material discovered only about 17 years ago that continues to surprise scientists with its interesting physics. The work, which involves structures composed of atomically thin layers of materials that are also biocompatible, could usher in new, faster information-processing paradigms. One potential application is in neuromorphic computing, which aims to replicate the neuronal cells in the body responsible for everything from behavior to memories.

LAB 3-D PRINTS MICROBES TO ENHANCE BIOMATERIALS

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have developed a new method for 3-D printing living microbes in controlled patterns, expanding the potential for using engineered bacteria to recover rare-earth metals, clean wastewater, detect uranium and more.

VIBRATING NANODROPLETS MAY INVADE A TUMOR

Sending tiny droplets to a tumor and having them vaporized using focused ultrasound: It could be a new way of tracing a tumor or deliver drugs locally. Researchers of the University of Twente now demonstrate a new phenomenon triggering droplet vaporization: It happens at the exact acoustic resonance frequency and causes fast and efficient lowering of the pressure inside the droplet, until below the threshold value for vaporization. The research results are published in Physical Review Letters.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

DOWNLOAD MP3/ZIP

You may also like

Leave a Comment

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Privacy & Cookies Policy
%d bloggers like this: