Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 11, 2021.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for February 11, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

RESEARCHERS REVIEW ADVANCEMENTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF STRETCHABLE TRANSISTORS

Over the past few decades, researchers have been trying to develop electronic components that are increasingly flexible and skin-like, as these could enable the fabrication of new wearable and implantable devices. Transistors, semiconductors that can conduct and insulate electric current, are among the most vital components of contemporary electronics.

RESEARCHERS CREATE VIRTUAL REALITY COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT

Virtual reality isn’t just for gaming. Researchers can use virtual reality, or VR, to assess participants’ attention, memory and problem-solving abilities in real world settings. By using VR technology to examine how folks complete daily tasks, like making a grocery list, researchers can better help clinical populations that struggle with executive functioning to manage their everyday lives.

GOOGLE MOVES AWAY FROM DIET OF ‘COOKIES’ TO TRACK USERS

Google is weaning itself off user-tracking “cookies” which allow the web giant to deliver personalized ads but which also have raised the hackles of privacy defenders.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

THE DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE PAULI PRINCIPLE

The Pauli exclusion principle is a law of quantum mechanics introduced by Austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli, which offers valuable insight about the structure of matter. More specifically, the Pauli principle states that two or more identical fermions cannot simultaneously occupy the same quantum state inside a quantum system.

HOLOGRAPHY ‘QUANTUM LEAP’ COULD REVOLUTIONISE IMAGING

A new type of quantum holography which uses entangled photons to overcome the limitations of conventional holographic approaches could lead to improved medical imaging and speed the advance of quantum information science.

‘MAGNETIC GRAPHENE’ FORMS A NEW KIND OF MAGNETISM

Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

FAST-GROWING PARTS OF AFRICA SEE A SURPRISE: LESS AIR POLLUTION FROM SEASONAL FIRES

Often, when populations and economies boom, so does air pollution—a product of increased fossil-fuel consumption by vehicles, industry and households. This has been true across much of Africa, where air pollution recently surpassed AIDS as the leading cause of premature death. But researchers have discovered at least a temporary bright spot: dangerous nitrogen oxides, byproducts of combustion, are declining across the north equatorial part of the continent. The reason: a decline in the longtime practice of setting of dry-season fires to manage land.

HOW ROCKS RUSTED ON EARTH AND TURNED RED

How did rocks rust on Earth and turn red? A Rutgers-led study has shed new light on the important phenomenon and will help address questions about the Late Triassic climate more than 200 million years ago, when greenhouse gas levels were high enough to be a model for what our planet may be like in the future.

ARCTIC STEW: UNDERSTANDING HOW HIGH-LATITUDE LAKES RESPOND TO AND AFFECT CLIMATE CHANGE

To arrive at Nunavut, turn left at the Dakotas and head north. You can’t miss it—the vast tundra territory covers almost a million square miles of northern Canada. Relatively few people call this lake-scattered landscape home, but the region plays a crucial role in understanding global climate change. New research from Soren Brothers, assistant professor in the Department of Watershed Sciences and Ecology Center, details how lakes in Nunavut could have a big impact on carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, and it’s not all bad news—at least for now. Brothers examined 23 years of data from lakes near Rankin Inlet. He noted a peculiarity—as the lakes warmed, their carbon dioxide concentrations fell. Most lakes are natural sources of carbon dioxide, but these lakes were now mostly near equilibrium with the atmosphere

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

WHERE SHOULD FUTURE ASTRONAUTS LAND ON MARS? FOLLOW THE WATER

So you want to build a Mars base. Where to start? Like any human settlement, it would be best located near accessible water. Not only will water be crucial for life-support supplies, it will be used for everything from agriculture to producing the rocket propellant astronauts will need to return to Earth.

HARVARD ASTRONOMER ARGUES THAT ALIEN VESSEL PAID US A VISIT

Discovering there’s intelligent life beyond our planet could be the most transformative event in human history— but what if scientists decided to collectively ignore evidence suggesting it already happened?

CHINA’S SPACE PROBE SENDS BACK ITS FIRST IMAGE OF MARS

China’s Tianwen-1 probe has sent back its first image of Mars, the national space agency said, as the mission prepares to touch down on the Red Planet later this year.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

WEARABLE PLASMONIC-METASURFACE SENSOR FOR UNIVERSAL MOLECULAR FINGERPRINT DETECTION ON BIOINTERFACES

Wearable sensing technology is an essential link in personalized medicine, where researchers must track multiple analytes inside the body simultaneously, to obtain a complete picture of human health. In a new report on Science Advances, Yingli Wang and a team of scientists in biosystems, engineering and information science at the University of Cambridge and Zhejiang University in the U.K. and China, presented a wearable plasmonic-electronic sensor with “universal” molecular recognition capability. The team introduced flexible plasmonic metasurfaces with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity as the fundamental sensing component. The system contained a flexible sweat extraction process to noninvasively extract and fingerprint analytes inside the body based on their unique Raman scattering spectra. As proof of concept, they successfully monitored varying trace-drug amounts inside the body to obtain an individual drug metabolic profile. The sensor bridged the gap in wearable sensing technology to provide a universal, sensitive molecular tracking process to assess human health.

SCIENTISTS CREATE ARMOUR FOR FRAGILE QUANTUM TECHNOLOGY

An international team of scientists has invented the equivalent of body armour for extremely fragile quantum systems, which will make them robust enough to be used as the basis for a new generation of low-energy electronics.

RESEARCHERS CREATE LOW-COST, AI-POWERED DEVICE TO MEASURE OPTICAL SPECTRA

A team of researchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering has demonstrated a new approach to an old problem: measuring spectra of light, also known as spectroscopy. By leveraging scalable, cost-effective nano-fabrication techniques, as well as AI-driven algorithms, they built and tested a system that is more compact than conventional spectrometers, while also offering additional design advantages.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment