Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 02, 2021.

253 views

JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR QUICK UPDATES ONLY

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 02, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

STP 3DS, 2021 V.6.0 STILL IN PROGRESS

STEP 1 on the programme memo done and dusted with the STP,C.T, celebrant’s text of thanks captioned:

“2,000,000 texts isn’t enough to type as gratitude messages, indeed the day is blessed.

Thanks to you all.

Step 2 of the programme on queue..

Thanks to you all, await…..”

A DEEP LEARNING TECHNIQUE TO SOLVE RUBIK’S CUBE AND OTHER PROBLEMS STEP-BY-STEP

Colin G. Johnson, an associate professor at the University of Nottingham, recently developed a deep-learning technique that can learn a so-called “fitness function” from a set of sample solutions to a problem. This technique, presented in a paper published in Wiley’s Expert Systems journal, was initially trained to solve the Rubik’s cube, the popular 3-D combination puzzle invented by Hungarian sculptor ErnΕ‘ Rubik.

A FLUID-MAGNETIC SOLUTION FOR SORTING PLASTIC WASTE

With the ever-increasing worldwide mass production of plastic, the inefficiency of current plastic recycling strategies has raised several environmental, societal, and economic concerns. Magnetic density separation (MDS) is an efficient state-of-the-art recycling technique that uses magnetized fluids to separate different types of plastic particles. Researcher Sina Tajfirooz has developed and validated a model to predict the collective motion of particles in MDS systems. Simulation results shed new light on the separation process in MDS systems and provide data that can help optimize the performance of future MDS systems. Tajfirooz defended his thesis on February 22nd at the department of Mechanical Engineering.

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP ROADSIDE BARRIER DESIGN TO MITIGATE AIR POLLUTION

Imperial researchers have designed a unique curved barrier which can protect people from the damaging effects of air pollution.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

RADIOACTIVITY IN METEORITES SHEDS LIGHT ON ORIGIN OF HEAVIEST ELEMENTS IN OUR SOLAR SYSTEM

A team of international researchers went back to the formation of the solar system 4.6 billion years ago to gain new insights into the cosmic origin of the heaviest elements on the period-ic table.

NUCLEAR PHYSICISTS ON THE HUNT FOR SQUEEZED PROTONS

While protons populate the nucleus of every atom in the universe, sometimes they can be squeezed into a smaller size and slip out of the nucleus for a romp on their own. Observing these squeezed protons may offer unique insights into the particles that build our universe.

LIGHT-TWISTING ‘CHIRAL’ NANOTECHNOLOGY COULD ACCELERATE DRUG SCREENING

A new approach makes liquid-crystal-like beacons out of harmful amyloid proteins present in diseases such as Type II diabetes.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

USING DEEP-SEA FIBER OPTIC CABLES TO DETECT EARTHQUAKES

Seismologists at Caltech working with optics experts at Google have developed a method to use existing underwater telecommunication cables to detect earthquakes. The technique could lead to improved earthquake and tsunami warning systems around the world.

STUDY HIGHLIGHTS NEED FOR IMPROVING METHANE EMISSION DATABASE

A University of Oklahoma-led study published in 2020 revealed that both area and plant growth of paddy rice is significantly related to the spatial-temporal dynamics of atmospheric methane concentration in monsoon Asia, where 87% of the world’s paddy rice fields are situated. Now, the same international research team has released a follow-up discussion paper in the journal Nature Communications. In this paper, the team identifies the limits and insufficiency of the major greenhouse emission database (EDGAR) in estimating paddy rice methane emissions.

MICROBES DEEP BENEATH SEAFLOOR SURVIVE ON BYPRODUCTS OF RADIOACTIVE PROCESS

A team of researchers from the University of Rhode Island’s Graduate School of Oceanography and their collaborators have revealed that the abundant microbes living in ancient sediment below the seafloor are sustained primarily by chemicals created by the natural irradiation of water molecules.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

THE GRANTECAN DISCOVERS THE LARGEST CLUSTER OF GALAXIES KNOWN IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

A study, led by researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and carried out with OSIRIS, an instrument on the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), has found the most densely populated galaxy cluster in formation in the primitive universe. The researchers predict that this structure, which is at a distance of 12.5 billion light years from us, will have evolved becoming a cluster similar to that of Virgo, a neighbor of the Local Group of galaxies to which the Milky Way belongs. The study is published in the specialized journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS).

IMAGING SPACE DEBRIS IN HIGH RESOLUTION

Litter is not only a problem on Earth. According to NASA, there are currently millions of pieces of space junk in the range of altitudes from 200 to 2,000 kilometers above the Earth’s surface, which is known as low Earth orbit (LEO). Most of the junk is comprised of objects created by humans, like pieces of old spacecraft or defunct satellites. This space debris can reach speeds of up to 18,000 miles per hour, posing a major danger to the 2,612 satellites that currently operate at LEO. Without effective tools for tracking space debris, parts of LEO may even become too hazardous for satellites.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

SUB-DIFFRACTION OPTICAL WRITING ENABLES DATA STORAGE AT THE NANOSCALE

The total amount of data generated worldwide is expected to reach 175 zettabytes (1 ZB equals 1 billion terabytes) by 2025. If 175 ZB were stored on Blu-ray disks, the stack would be 23 times the distance to the moon. There is an urgent need to develop storage technologies that can accommodate this enormous amount of data.

SCIENTISTS INVESTIGATE WALKER BREAKDOWN IN 3-D MAGNETIC NANOWIRES

Physicists from Russia, Chile, Brazil, Spain and the U.K., have studied how the magnetic properties change in 3-D nanowires, promising materials for various magnetic applications, depending on the shape of their cross-section. In particular, they more deeply probed the Walker breakdown phenomenon, which may have implications for future technology development. The research outcome appears in Scientific Reports.

enquires:[email protected]
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

DOWNLOAD MP3/ZIP

You may also like

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: