Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 03, 2021

268 views

JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR QUICK UPDATES ONLY

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 03, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

THE SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET 2021 3DS V.6.0 STILL IN PROGRESS

Now on Step 3 of the ongoing programme.

Check 03-17/03/2021 on the memo.

KINDLY DOWNLOAD THE SELECTED CHAT APPLICATIONS (PC/PHONE VERSION) to participate in the FREE LIVE STREAMING, WEBINARS, PRESENTATIONS on computer technologies scrutinizing

Amongst others.

The C.T advised.

A DESIGN TO IMPROVE THE RESILIENCE AND ELECTRICAL PERFORMANCE THIN METAL FILM BASED ELECTRODES

Flexible electrodes, electronic components that conduct electricity, are of key importance for the development of numerous wearable technologies, including smartwatches, fitness trackers and health monitoring devices. Ideally, electrodes inside wearable devices should retain their electrical conductance when they are stretched or deformed.

RESEARCHERS IMPROVE EFFICIENCY OF NEXT-GENERATION SOLAR CELL MATERIAL

Perovskites are a leading candidate for eventually replacing silicon as the material of choice for solar panels. They offer the potential for low-cost, low-temperature manufacturing of ultrathin, lightweight flexible cells, but so far their efficiency at converting sunlight to electricity has lagged behind that of silicon and some other alternatives.

NOVEL SOFT TACTILE SENSOR WITH SKIN-COMPARABLE CHARACTERISTICS FOR ROBOTS

A joint research team co-led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a new soft tactile sensor with skin-comparable characteristics. A robotic gripper with the sensor mounted at the fingertip could accomplish challenging tasks such as stably grasping fragile objects and threading a needle. Their research provided new insight into tactile sensor design and could contribute to various applications in the robotics field, such as smart prosthetics and human-robot interaction.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

WHEN FOAMS COLLAPSE (AND WHEN THEY DON’T)

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have revealed how liquid foams collapse by observing individual collapse events with high-speed video microscopy. They found that cracks in films led to a receding liquid front that sweeps up the original film border, inverts its shape, and releases a droplet, which hits and breaks other films. Their observations and physical model provide key insights into how to make foams more or less resistant to collapse.

INTERESTING PATTERN IN CROSS-SECTIONS OBSERVED IN F + HD → HF + D REACTION

A team of researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Southern University of Science and Technology, has discovered a thought-provoking pattern in cross-sections observed in an F + HD → HF + D reaction. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their double-pronged approach to learning more about the role of relativistic spin-orbit interactions in chemical reactions. T. Peter Rakitzis, with the University of Crete, and IESL-FORTH, has published a Perspectives piece in the same journal issue outlining the difficulty of studying chemical reactions at the quantum level and the work done by the team in China.

BOTTLING THE WORLD’S COLDEST PLASMA

Rice University physicists have discovered a way to trap the world’s coldest plasma in a magnetic bottle, a technological achievement that could advance research into clean energy, space weather and astrophysics.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

MICROPLASTIC SIZES IN HUDSON-RARITAN ESTUARY AND COASTAL OCEAN REVEALED

Rutgers scientists for the first time have pinpointed the sizes of microplastics from a highly urbanized estuarine and coastal system with numerous sources of fresh water, including the Hudson River and Raritan River.

NEW RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS HEALTH RISKS TO BABIES ON THE FRONT LINE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Extreme rainfall associated with climate change is causing harm to babies in some of the most forgotten places on the planet setting in motion a chain of disadvantage down the generations, according to new research in Nature Sustainability.

COVID-19 LOCKDOWN HIGHLIGHTS OZONE CHEMISTRY IN CHINA

In early 2020, daily life in Northern China slammed to a halt as the region entered a strict period of lockdown to slow the spread of COVID-19. Emissions from transportation and industry plummeted. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from fossil fuels fell by 60 to 70 percent.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

SPACEWALKING ASTRONAUTS PREP STATION FOR NEW SOLAR WINGS

Spacewalking astronauts ventured out Sunday to install support frames for new, high-efficiency solar panels arriving at the International Space Station later this year.

CHEMICAL SIGNATURES OF IRON PREDICT RED SUPERGIANT TEMPERATURE

Red supergiants are a class of star that end their lives in supernova explosions. Their lifecycles are not fully understood, partly due to difficulties in measuring their temperatures. For the first time, astronomers have developed an accurate method to determine the surface temperatures of red supergiants.

THE DISTANCE TO THE NORTH POLAR SPUR

One of the largest structures in the Milky Way galaxy, the North Polar Spur, was discovered at radio and X-ray wavelengths. The Spur is a giant ridge of bright emission that rises roughly perpendicularly out of the plane of the galaxy starting roughly in the constellation of Sagittarius and then curves upward, stretching across the sky for over thirty degrees (the size of sixty full-moons) where it appears to join other bright filamentary features. The emitted radiation is highly polarized, indicative of its being produced by ionized gas in the presence of strong magnetic fields. Depending on how far away the Spur is from us, its length estimates range from hundreds to thousands of light-years.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

SCIENTISTS USE LIPID NANOPARTICLES TO PRECISELY TARGET GENE EDITING TO THE LIVER

The genome editing technology CRISPR has emerged as a powerful new tool that can change the way we treat disease. The challenge when altering the genetics of our cells, however, is how to do it safely, effectively, and specifically targeted to the gene, tissue and organ that needs treatment. Scientists at Tufts University and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have developed unique nanoparticles comprised of lipids—fat molecules—that can package and deliver gene editing machinery specifically to the liver. In a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they have shown that they can use the lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) to efficiently deliver the CRISPR machinery into the liver of mice, resulting in specific genome editing and the reduction of blood cholesterol levels by as much as 57%—a reduction that can last for at least several months with just one shot.

NANOSHAPE IMPRINT LITHOGRAPHY USING MOLECULAR DYNAMICS OF POLYMER CROSSLINKING

Nanoscale applications in energy, optics and medicine have enhanced performance with nano-shaped structures. Such architectures can be fabricated at high-throughput beyond the capabilities of advanced optical lithography. In a new report on Microsystems & Nanoengineering, Anushman Cherala and a research team at the University of Texas at Austin Texas, U.S., expanded on nanoimprint lithography and extended the previous simulation framework to improve shape retention by varying the resist formula and introducing new bridge structures during nanoshape imprinting. The simulation study demonstrated viable approaches for nanoshaped imprinting with good shape retention matched by experimental data.

enquires:[email protected]
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

DOWNLOAD MP3/ZIP

You may also like

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: