Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 15, 2021.

262 views

JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR QUICK UPDATES ONLY

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 15, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

STEP 3 OF THE STP 3DS 2021 V.6.0 COMING TO AN END

It’s not too late to engage, be like Victor from MalawiπŸ‡²πŸ‡Ό

Surf SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET social media platforms for more reviews

RESEARCHERS ASSESS THE LIFE-CYCLE OF INDUSTRIAL AIR CAPTURE PLANTS OPERATED BY CLIMEWORKS

The ultimate target of many environmental interventions is to drastically reduce CO2 emissions and minimize its presence in the air. One tool that could help to achieve this goal is direct air capture (DAC) technology, which directly filters CO2 from the air, often via an adsorption-desorption process. While DAC technology is fairly promising, its high energy and material demands can lead to indirect greenhouse emissions and other undesired effects.

MAKING GREEN ENERGY THE DEFAULT CHOICE CAN HELP TACKLE CLIMATE CHANGE, STUDY FINDS

Researchers studying the Swiss energy market have found that making green energy the default option for consumers leads to an enduring shift to renewables and thus has the potential to cut CO2 emissions by millions of tonnes.

CLASSIC MATH PROBLEM SOLVED: COMPUTER SCIENTISTS HAVE DEVELOPED A SUPERB ALGORITHM FOR FINDING THE SHORTEST ROUTE

One of the most classic algorithmic problems deals with calculating the shortest path between two points. A more complicated variant of the problem is when the route traverses a changing network—whether this be a road network or the internet. For 40 years, researchers have sought an algorithm that provides an optimal solution to this problem. Now, computer scientist Christian Wulff-Nilsen of the University of Copenhagen and two research colleagues have come up with a recipe.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

OBSERVING THE BIRTH OF A QUASIPARTICLE

Over the past decades, physicists worldwide have been trying to gain a better understanding of non-equilibrium dynamics in quantum many-body systems. Some studies investigated what are known as quasiparticles, disturbances or entities in physical systems that exhibit behavior similar to that of particles.

SCIENTISTS STABILIZE ATOMICALLY THIN BORON FOR PRACTICAL USE

Northwestern University researchers have, for the first time, created borophane—atomically thin boron that is stable at standard temperatures and air pressures.

RESEARCHERS SET NEW RESOLUTION RECORD FOR IMAGING THE HUMAN EYE

Researchers have developed a noninvasive technique that can capture images of rod and cone photoreceptors with unprecedented detail. The advance could lead to new treatments and earlier detection for retinal diseases such as macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

CLIMATE CHANGE MAY NOT EXPAND DRYLANDS

Does a warmer climate mean more dry land? For years, researchers projected that drylands—including deserts, savannas and shrublands—will expand as the planet warms, but new research from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) challenges those prevailing views.

STUDY OF REDOUBT AND OTHER VOLCANOES IMPROVES UNREST DETECTION

Volcanologists do what they can to provide the public enough warning about impending eruptions, but volcanoes are notoriously unpredictable. Alerts are sometimes given with little time for people to react.

RESEARCHERS HOME IN ON THE AGE OF THE YANGTZE RIVER

A new study examining sediments from the Yangtze River sheds new light on the formation of one of the world’s great waterways.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

NOT SO FAST, SUPERNOVA: HIGHEST-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS DETECTED IN STAR CLUSTERS

For decades, researchers assumed the cosmic rays that regularly bombard Earth from the far reaches of the galaxy are born when stars go supernova—when they grow too massive to support the fusion occurring at their cores and explode.

MASSIVE STARS IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE MAY HAVE BEEN PROGENITORS OF SUPER-MASSIVE BLACK HOLES

Recent observations have shown that there is a supermassive black hole at the center of each galaxy. However, what is the origin of these supermassive black holes? It is still a mystery today. An international research team led by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) in Taiwan has predicted an extreme supernova from a supermassive star, possible the progenitor of supermassive black holes. Their calculation suggested that this supernova can be observed by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) that will be launched by the end of 2021.

PERSEVERANCE ROVER’S SUPERCAM SCIENCE INSTRUMENT DELIVERS FIRST RESULTS

The first readings from the SuperCam instrument aboard NASA’s Perseverance rover have arrived on Earth. SuperCam was developed jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico and a consortium of French research laboratories under the auspices of the Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The instrument delivered data to the French Space Agency’s operations center in Toulouse that includes the first audio of laser zaps on another planet.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

NEW ANALYSIS OF 2D PEROVSKITES COULD SHAPE THE FUTURE OF SOLAR CELLS AND LEDS

An innovative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) materials from engineers at the University of Surrey could boost the development of next-generation solar cells and LEDs.

TUMORS ILLUMINATED BRIGHTLY AND PRECISELY WITH NEW BIODEGRADABLE NANOPROBE

To highlight tumors in the body for cancer diagnosis, doctors can use tiny optical probes (nanoprobes) that light up when they attach to tumors. These nanoprobes allow doctors to detect the location, shape and size of cancers in the body.

enquires:[email protected]
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

DOWNLOAD MP3/ZIP

You may also like

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: