Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 25, 2021.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 25, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET 3DS 2021 V.6.0

Step 4 coming to an end soon, be a beneficiary before it’s too late.

The C.T advised.

Surf STP social media platforms for more

UK GAMERS AND POLITICIANS TAKE AIM AT CONSOLE ‘SCALPERS’

Furious British gamers and lawmakers are training their sights on “scalpers” who are buying up coveted PS5 and Xbox consoles and selling them online at vastly inflated prices.

MUSK TELLS CHINA DATA GATHERED BY TESLAS REMAIN SECRET: REPORT

Tesla boss Elon Musk strongly denied Saturday that his cars, which gather large amounts of data, could ever be used to spy on China despite fears raised by Beijing, the Wall Street Journal reported.

WITH FRIENDLY RIVALRIES, esports GAIN TRACTION IN CORPORATE WORLD

Microsoft software engineer Daniel Jost has found a way to take on his peers at Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google in friendly fashion—through video game competition.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

SCIENTISTS OBSERVE COMPLEX TUNABLE MAGNETISM TIED TO ELECTRICAL CONDUCTION IN A TOPOLOGICAL MATERIAL

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have observed novel helical magnetic ordering in the topological compound EuIn2As2 which supports exotic electrical conduction tunable by a magnetic field. The discovery has significant implications for basic research into functional topological properties and may one day find use in a number of advanced technology applications.

DIAMOND COLOR CENTERS FOR NONLINEAR PHOTONICS

Researchers from the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Tsukuba demonstrated second-order nonlinear optical effects in diamonds by taking advantage of internal color center defects that break inversion symmetry of diamond crystal. This research may lead to faster internet communications, all-optical computers, and even open a route to next generation quantum sensing technologies.

A MATERIAL THAT IS SUPERCONDUCTIVE AT ROOM TEMPERATURE AND LOWER PRESSURE

A team of researchers from the University of Rochester, the State University of New York at Buffalo and the University of Nevada Las Vegas has reduced the amount of pressure required to force a material to become superconductive at room temperature, improving on their own previous results. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group outlines their technique and plans for the future.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

EXPLOSIVE ORIGINS OF ‘SECONDARY’ ICE—AND SNOW

Where does snow come from? This may seem like a simple question to ponder as half the planet emerges from a season of watching whimsical flakes fall from the sky—and shoveling them from driveways. But a new study on how water becomes ice in slightly supercooled Arctic clouds may make you rethink the simplicity of the fluffy stuff. The study, published by scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, includes new direct evidence that shattering drizzle droplets drive explosive “ice multiplication” events. The findings have implications for weather forecasts, climate modeling, water supplies—and even energy and transportation infrastructure.

DEEP SEAFLOOR NUTRIENT VITAL IN GLOBAL FOOD CHAIN

Eroded seabed rocks are providing an essential source of nutrition for drifting marine organisms at the base of the food chain, according to new research.

TOXIC PAH AIR POLLUTANTS FROM FOSSIL FUELS ‘MULTIPLY’ IN SUNLIGHT

When power stations burn coal, a class of compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, form part of the resulting air pollution. Researchers have found that PAH toxins degrade in sunlight into child compounds and byproducts.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

NO THREAT TO EARTH AS HUGE ASTEROID ZOOMS PAST

The largest asteroid to pass by Earth this year has made its closest approach, posing no threat of a cataclysmic collision but giving astronomers a rare chance to study a rock formed during the beginning of our solar system.

HUBBLE CAPTURES RE-ENERGIZED PLANETARY NEBULA

Located around 5,000 light-years away in the constellation of Cygnus (the Swan), Abell 78 is an unusual type of planetary nebula.

MARS WATER LOSS SHAPED BY SEASONS AND STORMS

Mars has lost most of its once plentiful water, with small amounts remaining in the planet’s atmosphere. ESA’s Mars Express now reveals more about where this water has gone, showing that its escape to space is accelerated by dust storms and the planet’s proximity to the Sun, and suggesting that some water may have retreated underground.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

PLASMONIC NANOREACTORS REGULATE SELECTIVE OXIDATION VIA ENERGETIC ELECTRONS AND NANOCONFINED THERMAL FIELDS

When optimizing catalysis in the lab, product selectivity and conversion efficiency are primary goals for materials scientists. Efficiency and selectivity are often mutually antagonistic, where high selectivity is accompanied by low efficiency and vice versa. Increasing the temperature can also change the reaction pathway. In a new report, Chao Zhan and a team of scientists in chemistry and chemical engineering at the Xiamen University in China and the University of California, Santa Barbara, U.S., constructed hierarchical plasmonic nanoreactors to show nonconfined thermal fields and electrons. The combined attributes uniquely coexisted in plasmonic nanostructures. The team regulated parallel reaction pathways for propylene partial oxidation and selectively produced acrolein during the experiments to form products that are different from thermal catalysis. The work described a strategy to optimize chemical processes and achieve high yields with high selectivity at lower temperature under visible light illumination. The work is now published on Science Advances.

PLANTING THE SEED FOR DNA NANOCONSTRUCTS THAT GROW TO THE MICRON SCALE

A team of nanobiotechnologists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) led by Wyss Founding Core Faculty member William Shih, Ph.D., has devised a programmable DNA self-assembly strategy that solves the key challenge of robust nucleation control and paves the way for applications such as ultrasensitive diagnostic biomarker detection and scalable fabrication of micrometer-sized structures with nanometer-sized features.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment