Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 30, 2021.

301 views

JOIN OUR WHATSAPP GROUP FOR QUICK UPDATES ONLY

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for March 30, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

STP 3DS 2021 V.6.0 QUALIFIERS WORTHY MATERIALS DISBURSEMENT KICK-START

A 3-Days giveaway project, the final lapse of the programme (29-31/03/2021)

It’s DAY2 surf more on all SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET social media platforms

DESIGN COULD ENABLE LONGER LASTING, MORE POWERFUL LITHIUM BATTERIES

Lithium-ion batteries have made possible the lightweight electronic devices whose portability we now take for granted, as well as the rapid expansion of electric vehicle production. But researchers around the world are continuing to push limits to achieve ever-greater energy densities—the amount of energy that can be stored in a given mass of material—in order to improve the performance of existing devices and potentially enable new applications such as long-range drones and robots.

A SIMPLE WAY TO TURN 2D DRAWINGS INTO 3D OBJECTS

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Korea has developed a simple method for converting 2D drawings to 3D objects. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their technique and possible uses for it.

RESEARCHERS HARVEST ENERGY FROM RADIO WAVES TO POWER WEARABLE DEVICES

From microwave ovens to Wi-Fi connections, the radio waves that permeate the environment are not just signals of energy consumed but are also sources of energy themselves. An international team of researchers, led by Huanyu “Larry” Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, has developed a way to harvest energy from radio waves to power wearable devices.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

RESEARCHERS CAPTURE FIRST 3D SUPER-RESOLUTION IMAGES IN LIVING MICE

Researchers have developed a new microscopy technique that can acquire 3-D super-resolution images of subcellular structures from about 100 microns deep inside biological tissue, including the brain. By giving scientists a deeper view into the brain, the method could help reveal subtle changes that occur in neurons over time, during learning, or as result of disease.

DETECTING PHOTONS TRANSPORTING QUBITS WITHOUT DESTROYING QUANTUM INFORMATION

Even though quantum communication is tap-proof, it is so far not particularly efficient. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics want to change this. They have developed a detection method that can be used to track quantum transmissions. Quantum information is sent over long distances in the form of photons (i.e. light particles). However, these are quickly lost. Finding out after only a partial distance whether such a photon is still on its way to its destination or has already been lost, can significantly reduce the effort required for information processing. This would make applications such as the encryption of money transfers much more practicable.

REVEALING NANO BIG BANG: SCIENTISTS OBSERVE THE FIRST MILLISECONDS OF CRYSTAL FORMATION

When we grow crystals, atoms first group together into small clusters—a process called nucleation. But understanding exactly how such atomic ordering emerges from the chaos of randomly moving atoms has long eluded scientists.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

CHANGES IN OCEAN CHEMISTRY SHOW HOW SEA LEVEL AFFECTS GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE

A new analysis of strontium isotopes in marine sediments has enabled scientists to reconstruct fluctuations in ocean chemistry related to changing climate conditions over the past 35 million years.

CALIFORNIA’S DIESEL EMISSIONS RULES REDUCE AIR POLLUTION, PROTECT VULNERABLE COMMUNITIES

Extending California’s stringent diesel emissions standards to the rest of the U.S. could dramatically improve the nation’s air quality and health, particularly in lower income communities of color, finds a new analysis published today in the journal Science.

LA’S BIGGEST QUAKE THREAT SITS ON OVERLOOKED PART OF SAN ANDREAS, STUDY SAYS. THAT MAY BE GOOD

Scientists have pinpointed a long-overlooked portion of the southern San Andreas Fault that they say could pose the most significant earthquake risk for the Greater Los Angeles area—and it’s about 80 years overdue for release.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

NEW LIGHT ON BARYONIC MATTER AND GRAVITY ON COSMIC SCALES

Scientists estimate that dark matter and dark energy together are some 95% of the gravitational material in the universe while the remaining 5% is baryonic matter, which is the “normal” matter composing stars, planets and living beings. However, for decades, almost one-half of this matter has not been found. Now, using a new technique, a team including researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has shown that this “missing” baryonic matter fills the space between galaxies as hot, low-density gas. The same technique also gives a new tool that shows that the gravitational attraction experienced by galaxies is compatible with the theory of general relativity. This research is published in three articles in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS).

PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT TO BE SCIENCE FICTION, A PLANET IN A TRIPLE-STAR SYSTEM HAS BEEN DISCOVERED

KOI-5Ab is a newly discovered planet in a triple-star system. It is a great example of the kind of astonishing discoveries that result from co-operation between large teams of astronomers using different types of telescopes and observation techniques.

ASTROPHYSICISTS SIMULATE MICROSCOPIC CLUSTERS FROM THE BIG BANG

The very first moments of the Universe can be reconstructed mathematically even though they cannot be observed directly. Physicists from the Universities of Göttingen and Auckland (New Zealand) have greatly improved the ability of complex computer simulations to describe this early epoch. They discovered that a complex network of structures can form in the first trillionth of a second after the Big Bang. The behavior of these objects mimics the distribution of galaxies in today’s Universe. In contrast to today, however, these primordial structures are microscopically small. Typical clumps have masses of only a few grams and fit into volumes much smaller than present-day elementary particles. The results of the study have been published in the journal Physical Review D.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

ON-CHIP TORSION BALANCE WITH FEMTONEWTON FORCE RESOLUTION AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

The torsion balance contains a rigid balance beam suspended by a fine thread as an ancient scientific instrument that continues to form a very sensitive force sensor to date. The force sensitivity is proportional to the lengths of the beam and thread and inversely proportional to the fourth power of the diameter of the thread; therefore, nanomaterials that support the torsion balances should be ideal building blocks. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Lin Cong and a research team in quantum physics, microelectronics and nanomaterials in China have detailed a torsional balance array on a chip with the highest sensitivity level. The team facilitated this by using a carbon nanotube as the thread and a monolayer graphene coated with aluminum films as the beam and mirror. Using the experimental setup, Cong et al. measured the femtonewton force exerted by a weak laser. The balances on the chip served as an ideal platform to investigate fundamental interactions up to zeptonewton in accuracy.

EXPLORING THE NANOWORLD IN 3D

Imagine a cube on which light is projected by a flashlight. The cube reflects the light in a particular way, so simply spinning the cube or moving the flashlight makes it possible to examine each aspect and deduce information regarding its structure. Now, imagine that this cube is just a few atoms high, that the light is detectable only in infrared, and that the flashlight is a beam from a microscope. How to go about examining each of the cube’s sides? That is the question recently answered by scientists from the CNRS, l’Université Paris-Saclay, the University of Graz and Graz University of Technology (Austria) by generating the first 3D image of the structure of the infrared light near the nanocube. Their results will be published on 26 March 2021 in Science.

enquires:[email protected]
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

DOWNLOAD MP3/ZIP

You may also like

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: