Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for May 31, 2021.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for May 31, 2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

🗞 TECHNOLOGY NEWS💻🔧🖥:

STP COURIER SERVICE TEST RUN

After several months video upload of the FAST-MODE FILTER VERSION of SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET courier services test-running from Nigeria🇳🇬 to Dubai🇦🇪.

It’s clearer version to be released in less than 24hours.

Stay connected to all SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET social media platforms for more.

MICROSOFT ANNOUNCES FIRST PRODUCT FEATURES RUNNING ON GPT-3

During its Build developers conference this year, Microsoft announced its first features for a product fueled by GPT-3, the natural language model from OpenAI developed to assist users in building applications without any programming knowledge.

RESEARCHERS TAKE A PRACTICAL LOOK BEYOND SHORT-TERM ENERGY STORAGE

With variable renewable energy (VRE) expected to become a much larger share of the global energy mix, storage solutions are needed beyond short-duration timescales, such as standard commercial batteries, which are suitable for covering hourly differences in net load.

ONE-DIMENSIONAL ANDERSON INSULATORS PREDICTED TO HOST THE BULK PHOTOVOLTAIC EFFECT

Materials in which electrons are strongly localized are promising for use in next-generation solar cells and optoelectronic devices, calculations by a RIKEN theoretical physicist and a collaborator have indicated.

🗞 PHYSICS NEWS⚙♨:

PHYSICISTS UNCOVER SECRETS OF WORLD’S THINNEST SUPERCONDUCTOR

Physicists from across three continents report the first experimental evidence to explain the unusual electronic behavior behind the world’s thinnest superconductor, a material with myriad applications because it conducts electricity extremely efficiently. In this case the superconductor is only an atomic layer thick.

SCIENTISTS UNRAVEL NOISE-ASSISTED SIGNAL AMPLIFICATION IN SYSTEMS WITH MEMORY

Signals can be amplified by an optimum amount of noise, but stochastic resonance is a fragile phenomenon. Researchers at AMOLF were the first to investigate the role of memory for this phenomenon in an oil-filled optical microcavity. The effects of slow non-linearity (i.e. memory) on stochastic resonance were never considered before, but these experiments suggest that stochastic resonance becomes robust to variations in the signal frequency when systems have memory. This has implications in many fields of physics and energy technology. In particular, the scientists numerically show that introducing slow nonlinearity in a mechanical oscillator harvesting energy from noise can increase its efficiency tenfold. They have published their findings in Physical Review Letters on May 27th.

NEW MICROSCOPY METHOD REACHES DEEPER INTO THE LIVING BRAIN

Researchers have developed a new technique that allows microscopic fluorescence imaging at four times the depth limit imposed by light diffusion. Fluorescence microscopy is often used to image molecular and cellular details of the brain in animal models of various diseases but, until now, has been limited to small volumes and highly invasive procedures due to intense light scattering by the skin and skull.

🗞 EARTH NEWS🌏:

SLUSHY ICEBERG AGGREGATES CONTROL CALVING TIMING ON GREENLAND’S JAKOBSHAVN ISBRÆ

Shortly before Jakobshavn Isbræ, a tidewater glacier in Greenland, calves massive chunks of ice into the ocean, there’s a sudden change in the slushy collection of icebergs floating along the glacier’s terminus, according to a new paper led by the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at CU Boulder. The work, published in Nature Geoscience, shows that a relaxation in the thick aggregate of icebergs floating at the glacier-ocean boundary occurs up to an hour before calving events. This finding may help scientists better understand future sea-level rise scenarios and could also help them predict when major episodes of calving are about to occur.

BETTER PEATLAND MANAGEMENT COULD CUT HALF A BILLION TONS OF CARBON

Half a billion tonnes of carbon emissions could be cut from Earth’s atmosphere by improved management of peatlands, according to research partly undertaken at the University of Leicester.

KEEPING MORE AMMONIUM IN SOIL COULD DECREASE POLLUTION, BOOST CROPS

Modern-day agriculture faces two major dilemmas: how to produce enough food to feed the growing human population and how to minimize environmental damage associated with intensive agriculture. Keeping more nitrogen in soil as ammonium may be one key way to address both challenges, according to a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

🗞 ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWS🌪🎇:

EXPERIMENTS VALIDATE THE POSSIBILITY OF HELIUM RAIN INSIDE JUPITER AND SATURN

Nearly 40 years ago, scientists first predicted the existence of helium rain inside planets composed primarily of hydrogen and helium, such as Jupiter and Saturn. However, achieving the experimental conditions necessary to validate this hypothesis hasn’t been possible—until now.

BLACK HOLE SIMULATIONS PROVIDE BLUEPRINT FOR FUTURE OBSERVATIONS

Astronomers continue to develop computer simulations to help future observatories better home in on black holes, the most elusive inhabitants of the universe.

30-YEAR STELLAR SURVEY CRACKS MYSTERIES OF GALAXY’S GIANT PLANETS

Current and former astronomers from the University of Hawaiʻi Institute for Astronomy (IfA) have wrapped up a massive collaborative study that set out to determine if most solar systems in the universe are similar to our own. With the help of W. M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea in Hawaiʻi, the 30-year planetary census sought to find where giant planets tend to reside relative to their host stars.

🗞 NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWS⛄☃:

ZERO-CARBON ENERGY FROM SEAWATER NOW A STEP CLOSER

Researchers at McGill University have demonstrated a technique that could enable the production of robust, high-performance membranes to harness an abundant source of renewable energy.

RESEARCH TEAM DISCOVERS THAT IT TAKES SOME HEAT TO FORM ICE ON GRAPHENE

In a paper published in Nature Communications, the research team details the complex physical processes at work to understand the chemistry of ice formation. The molecular-level perspective of this process may help in predicting the formation and melting of ice, from individual crystals to glaciers and ice sheets. The latter being crucial to quantify environmental transformation in connection with climate change and global warming.

HIGH-CAPACITY PSEUDOCAPACITIVE ELECTRODES BY VALENCE ENGINEERING DEVELOPED FOR DESALINATION

Recently, the researchers from Institute of Solid State Physics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences used valence engineering to develop three manganese oxides as electrodes with different Mn valences for high-performance capacitive desalination.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment