Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for May 6,2021.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for May 6,2021.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP A ROBOTIC GUIDE DOG TO ASSIST BLIND INDIVIDUALS

Guide dogs, dogs that are trained to help humans move through their environments, have played a critical role in society for many decades. These highly trained animals, in fact, have proved to be valuable assistants for visually impaired individuals, allowing them to safely navigate indoor and outdoor environments.

SOLAR-POWERED DESALINATION UNIT SHOWS GREAT PROMISE

Despite the vast amount of water on Earth, most of it is nonpotable seawater. Freshwater accounts for only about 2.5% of the total, so much of the world experiences serious water shortages.

ENERGY-SAVING GAS TURBINES FROM THE 3D PRINTER

3D printing has opened up a completely new range of possibilities. One example is the production of novel turbine buckets. However, the 3D printing process often induces internal stress in the components, which can, in the worst case, lead to cracks. Now a research team has succeeded in using neutrons from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) research neutron source for non-destructive detection of this internal stress—a key achievement for the improvement of the production processes.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

PHYSICISTS NET NEUTRON STAR GOLD FROM MEASUREMENT OF LEAD

Nuclear physicists have made a new, highly accurate measurement of the thickness of the neutron “skin” that encompasses the lead nucleus in experiments conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and just published in Physical Review Letters. The result, which revealed a neutron skin thickness of .28 millionths of a nanometer, has important implications for the structure and size of neutron stars.

STRETCHING A SUBSTRATE PROVIDES A FASTER WAY TO CONTROL ANISOTROPIC WETTING

A team of researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Twente has found that stretching a substrate provides a new and easier way to control anisotropic wetting. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes testing they conducted with drops sliding across a stretched surface.

PLASMA ACCELERATION: IT’S ALL IN THE MIX

The LUX team at DESY is celebrating not just one but two milestones in the development of innovative plasma accelerators. The scientists from the University of Hamburg and DESY used their accelerator to test a technique that allows the energy distribution of the electron beams produced to be kept particularly narrow. They also used artificial intelligence to allow the accelerator to optimize its own operation. The scientists are reporting their experiments in two papers published shortly after one another in the journal Physical Review Letters. “It’s fantastic to see the speed with which the new technology of plasma acceleration is reaching a level of maturity where it can be used in a wide range of applications,” congratulates Wim Leemans, Director of the Accelerator Division at DESY.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

FLOOD RISK TO NEW HOMES IN ENGLAND AND WALES WILL INCREASE IN DISADVANTAGED AREAS

The building of new homes continues in flood-prone parts of England and Wales, and losses from flooding remain high. A new study, which looked at a recent decade of house building, concluded that a disproportionate number of homes built in struggling or declining neighborhoods will end up in high flood-risk areas due to climate change.

UNPRECEDENTED COMBINATION OF WEATHER AND DROUGHT CONDITIONS FUELED OREGON’S SEPTEMBER WILDFIRES

An unprecedented combination of strong easterly winds and low humidity coupled with prolonged drought conditions drove the spread of catastrophic wildfires in the Oregon Cascades last September, a new study has found.

PANDEMIC LOCKDOWNS RESULTED IN REDUCED SNOW AND ICE MELT IN INDUS RIVER BASIN

A team of researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara and the University of Colorado, has found that the COVID pandemic lockdown resulted in reduced snow and ice melt in the Indus River Basin last year. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of dust and soot in the region last year and the impact it had on how much ice and snow melted.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

PROBING DEEP SPACE WITH INTERSTELLAR

When the four-decades-old Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft entered interstellar space in 2012 and 2018, respectively, scientists celebrated. These plucky spacecraft had already traveled 120 times the distance from the Earth to the sun to reach the boundary of the heliosphere, the bubble encompassing our solar system that’s affected by the solar wind. The Voyagers discovered the edge of the bubble but left scientists with many questions about how our Sun interacts with the local interstellar medium. The twin Voyagers’ instruments provide limited data, leaving critical gaps in our understanding of this region.

ASTRONOMERS DETECT NEW CHEMICAL SIGNATURE IN AN EXOPLANET’S ATMOSPHERE USING SUBARU TELESCOPE

An international collaboration of astronomers led by a researcher from the Astrobiology Center and Queen’s University Belfast has detected a new chemical signature in the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet—i.e., a planet that orbits a star other than our sun. The hydroxyl radical (OH) was found on the dayside of the exoplanet WASP-33b. This planet is a so-called ‘ultra-hot Jupiter,” a gas-giant planet orbiting its host star much closer than Mercury orbits the sun (Figure 1) and therefore reaching atmospheric temperatures of more than 2500 degrees C (hot enough to melt most metals). The lead researcher based at the Astrobiology Center and Queen’s University Belfast, Dr. Stevanus Nugroho, says, “This is the first direct evidence of OH in the atmosphere of a planet beyond the solar system. It shows not only that astronomers can detect this molecule in exoplanet atmospheres, but also that they can begin to understand the detailed chemistry of this planetary population.”

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

NONTOXIC, FLEXIBLE ENERGY CONVERTERS COULD POWER WEARABLE DEVICES

A wide variety of portable and wearable electronics have become a large part of our daily lives, so a group of Stanford University researchers wondered if these could be powered by harvesting electricity from the waste heat that exists all around us.

RESEARCHERS DISCOVER TWO-DIMENSIONAL MATERIAL USING HIGH-PRESSURE TECHNOLOGY

An international team with researchers from the University of Bayreuth has succeeded for the first time in discovering a previously unknown two-dimensional material by using modern high-pressure technology. The new material, beryllonitrene, consists of regularly arranged nitrogen and beryllium atoms. It has an unusual electronic lattice structure that shows great potential for applications in quantum technology. Its synthesis required a compression pressure that is about one million times higher than the pressure of the Earth’s atmosphere. The scientists have presented their discovery in the journal Physical Review Letters.

SCIENTISTS DESIGN ‘NANOTRAPS’ TO CATCH, CLEAR CORONAVIRUS

Researchers at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering (PME) at the University of Chicago have designed a completely novel potential treatment for COVID-19: nanoparticles that capture SARS-CoV-2 viruses within the body and then use the body’s own immune system to destroy it.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment