Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 16, 2020.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 16, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

*T.P.E.A.N*

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

PROGRAMMABLE ELECTRONICS BASED ON THE REVERSIBLE DOPING OF 2-D SEMICONDUCTORS

In recent years, researchers have been trying to develop new types of highly performing electronic devices. As silicon-based devices are approaching their maximum performance, they have recently started exploring the potential of fabricating electronics using alternative superconductors.

JET-PRINTING COMPLEX CIRCUITS USING MICROFLUIDICS

Biomedical applications in life sciences can greatly benefit from microfluidics devices; however, the technology is suboptimal for rapid production and applications in biolabs. For instance, solid opaque walls of conventional microfluidic devices prevent biologists from providing adequate physical and optical access to their biological samples. Therefore, there is a growing need to engineer optimized microfluidics for efficient workflow. In a new study, Cristian Soitu and a research team at the Walsh and Cook Research Groups in the Department of Engineering Science and the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology at the University of Oxford, U.K., described a new contactless, microfluidics circuit fabrication method.

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY METHOD COULD LOWER COSTS TO RECYCLE LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES

A new process for restoring spent cathodes to mint condition could make it more economical to recycle lithium-ion batteries. The process, developed by nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, is more environmentally friendly than today’s methods; it uses greener ingredients, consumes 80 to 90% less energy, and emits about 75% less greenhouse gases.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

THE FIRST DEMONSTRATION OF PHASE-MATCHING BETWEEN AN ELECTRON WAVE AND A LIGHT WAVE

While researchers have conducted countless studies exploring the interaction between light waves and bound electron systems, the quantum interactions between free electrons and light have only recently become a topic of interest within the physics community. The observation of free electron-light interactions was facilitated by the discovery of a technique known as photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM).

ADVANCED ATOMIC CLOCK MAKES A BETTER DARK MATTER DETECTOR

JILA researchers have used a state-of-the-art atomic clock to narrow the search for elusive dark matter, an example of how continual improvements in clocks have value beyond timekeeping.

BENDING LIGHT TO ENGINEER IMPROVED OPTICAL DEVICES AND CIRCUITS

Rainbows are formed when light bends—or refracts—as it enters and exits a water droplet. The amount that the light bends depends on the color of the light, resulting in white light being separated into a beautiful spectrum of colors. The index of refraction, one of the tools that optical engineers use to control light, describes the interaction between light and matter.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

ENDING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS MAY NOT STOP GLOBAL WARMING: STUDY

Even if humanity stopped emitting greenhouse gases tomorrow, Earth will warm for centuries to come and oceans will rise by metres, according to a controversial modelling study published Thursday.

POSSIBLE THOUSAND-KILOMETER-LONG RIVER RUNNING DEEP BELOW GREENLAND’S ICE SHEET

Computational models suggest that melting water originating in the deep interior of Greenland could flow the entire length of a subglacial valley and exit at Petermann Fjord, along the northern coast of the island. Updating ice sheet models with this open valley could provide additional insight for future climate change predictions.

COVID SHUTDOWN EFFECT ON AIR QUALITY MIXED

In April 2020, as Delaware and states across the country adopted social distancing measures to deal with the public health crisis caused by the coronavirus (COVID-19), University of Delaware professor Cristina Archer recalled having a bunch of people tell her that the skies looked bluer than usual.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

NEUTRON STAR MERGER RESULTS IN MAGNETAR WITH BRIGHTEST KILONOVA EVER OBSERVED

Long ago and far across the universe, an enormous burst of gamma rays unleashed more energy in a half-second than the sun will produce over its entire 10-billion-year lifetime.

ESCAPE FROM MARS: HOW WATER FLED THE RED PLANET

Mars once had oceans but is now bone-dry, leaving many to wonder how the water was lost. University of Arizona researchers have discovered a surprisingly large amount of water in the upper atmosphere of Mars, where it is rapidly destroyed, explaining part of this Martian mystery.

CURIOSITY TAKES SELFIE WITH ‘MARY ANNING’ ON THE RED PLANET

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover has a new selfie. This latest is from a location named “Mary Anning,” after a 19th-century English paleontologist whose discovery of marine-reptile fossils were ignored for generations because of her gender and class. The rover has been at the site since this past July, taking and analyzing drill samples.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

NANOMETRIC CARBON NITRIDE PHOTOCATALYSTS WITH ‘A LA CARTE’ PROPERTIES

Industry has an increasingly urgent need to switch to sustainable, synthetic schemes to access widely used chemicals. In this context, it is crucial to come up with heterogeneous photocatalysis processes using readily available, metal-free catalysts.

SMALLER THAN EVER—EXPLORING THE UNUSUAL PROPERTIES OF QUANTUM-SIZED MATERIALS

The development of functional nanomaterials has been a major landmark in the history of materials science. Nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5 to 500 nm have unprecedented properties, such as high catalytic activity, compared to their bulk material counterparts. Moreover, as particles become smaller, exotic quantum phenomena become more prominent. This has enabled scientists to produce materials and devices with characteristics that had been only dreamed of, especially in the fields of electronics, catalysis, and optics.

CHARGES CASCADING ALONG A MOLECULAR CHAIN

Small electronic circuits power our everyday lives, from the tiny cameras in our phones to the microprocessors in our computers. To make those devices even smaller, scientists and engineers are designing circuitry components out of single molecules. Not only could miniaturized circuits offer the benefits of increased device density, speed, and energy efficiency—for example in flexible electronics or in data storage—but harnessing the physical properties of specific molecules could lead to devices with unique functionalities. However, developing practical nanoelectronic devices from single molecules requires precise control over the electronic behavior of those molecules, and a reliable method by which to fabricate them.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment