Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 17, 2020.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 17, 2020.


Spotlight Stories Headlines

*T.P.E.A.N*

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

HAMLET: A PLATFORM TO SIMPLIFY AI RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Machine learning (ML) algorithms have proved to be highly valuable computational tools for tackling a variety of real-world problems, including image, audio and text classification tasks. Computer scientists worldwide are developing more of these algorithms every day; thus, keeping track of them and quickly finding or accessing those introduced in the past is becoming increasingly challenging.

SCIENTISTS USE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TO FORECAST LARGE-SCALE TRAFFIC PATTERNS MORE ACCURATELY

It’s no secret that Los Angeles is notorious for its traffic jams, typically ranking first in studies of the nation’s traffic hot spots. Estimates suggest that Angelinos spend an extra 120 hours a year stuck in them. While a nightmare for drivers, the L.A. transportation system does have its advantages if you’re devising a new system to quickly predict and potentially redirect that traffic.

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE MAKES ‘SMART’ APPS FASTER, MORE EFFICIENT

Tired of Siri or Google Assistant draining your phone battery?

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

IN NEW STEP TOWARD QUANTUM TECH, SCIENTISTS SYNTHESIZE ‘BRIGHT’ QUANTUM BITS

With their ability to harness the strange powers of quantum mechanics, qubits are the basis for potentially world-changing technologies—like powerful new types of computers or ultra-precise sensors.

HOLOGRAPHIC FLUORESCENCE IMAGING TO 3-D TRACK EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES

Biologists commonly use fluorescence microscopy due to the molecular specificity and super-resolution of the technique. However, the method is withheld by imaging limits. In a new report on Science Advances, Matz Liebel and a research team at the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Spain and the U.S. reported an imaging approach to recover the full electric field of fluorescent light using single-molecule sensitivity. The team experimented with the concept of digital holography for fast fluorescence detection by tracking the three-dimensional (3-D) trajectory of individual nanoparticles using an in-plane resolution of 15 nanometers. As proof-of-concept biological applications, the researchers imaged the 3-D motion of extracellular vesicles inside live cells.

RESEARCHERS CREATE MRI-LIKE TECHNIQUE FOR IMAGING MAGNETIC WAVES

A team of researchers from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Leiden University, Tohoku University and the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter has developed a new type of MRI scanner that can image waves in ultrathin magnets. Unlike electrical currents, these so-called spin waves produce little heat, making them promising signal carriers for future green ICT applications.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

CONTROLLING LIGHT COULD LEAVE TOXIC ALGAE DEAD IN THE WATER, RESEARCHERS FIND

While vacationing in Canada’s Rocky Mountains several years ago, Rebecca North was looking for a peaceful break from her work as a water researcher at the University of Missouri. But as she admired one of the clear, pristine lakes that appear throughout much of the area, she experienced a moment of inspiration that had implications for one of the most pressing challenges facing the world’s bodies of water: toxic algae.

HEAVY RAINFALL DRIVES ONE-THIRD OF NITROGEN RUNOFF, ACCORDING TO NEW STUDY

Heavy rain events that occur only a few days a year can account for up to one-third of the annual nitrogen runoff from farmland in the Mississippi River basin, according to a new study by Iowa State University scientists.

STUDY IDENTIFIES THE UNDERSEA ORIGINS OF MYSTERIOUS LOVE WAVES, DECODING SOME OF EARTH’S CONTINUOUS VIBRATIONS

Vibrations travel through our planet in waves, like chords ringing out from a strummed guitar. Earthquakes, volcanoes and the bustle of human activity excite some of these seismic waves. Many more reverberate from wind-driven ocean storms.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

SOLAR SYSTEM FORMED IN LESS THAN 200,000 YEARS

A long time ago—roughly 4.5 billion years—our sun and solar system formed over the short time span of 200,000 years. That is the conclusion of a group of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists after looking at isotopes of the element molybdenum found on meteorites.

EARTH MAY HAVE CAPTURED A STRAY 1960S-ERA ROCKET BOOSTER

Earth has captured a tiny object from its orbit around the sun and will keep it as a temporary satellite for a few months before it escapes back to a solar orbit. But the object is likely not an asteroid; it’s probably the Centaur upper stage rocket booster that helped lift NASA’s ill-fated Surveyor 2 spacecraft toward the moon in 1966.

FAMILY TREE OF THE MILKY WAY DECIPHERED

Scientists have known for some time that galaxies can grow by the merging of smaller galaxies, but the ancestry of our own Milky Way galaxy has been a long-standing mystery. Now, an international team of astrophysicists has succeeded in reconstructing the first complete family tree of our home galaxy by analyzing the properties of globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way with artificial intelligence. The work is published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

PEARLS MAY PROVIDE NEW INFORMATION PROCESSING OPTIONS FOR BIOMEDICAL, MILITARY INNOVATIONS

Pearls have long been favored as objects of beauty. Now, Purdue University innovators are using the gem to provide potential new opportunities for spectral information processing that can be applied to spectroscopy in biomedical and military applications.

SCIENTISTS DISCOVER NEW FAMILY OF QUASIPARTICLES IN GRAPHENE-BASED MATERIALS

A group of researchers led by Sir Andre Geim and Dr. Alexey Berdyugin at The University of Manchester have discovered and characterized a new family of quasiparticles named ‘Brown-Zak fermions’ in graphene-based superlattices.

PRODUCING MATERIALS TO HELP BREAK THE ELECTRONICS SCALING LIMIT

Ph.D. candidate Saravana Balaji Basuvalingam at the TU/e Department of Applied Physics has developed a new approach to grow, in a controlled and effective way, a library of so-called “TMC materials” with various properties at low-temperatures. This brings the world one step closer to moving beyond silicon-based semiconductor devices.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment