Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 18, 2020.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 18, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

AN ORIGAMI-INSPIRED ROBOTIC FINGERTIP WITH SHAPE-MORPHING CAPABILITIES

To perform tasks that involve moving or handling objects, robots should swiftly adapt their grasp and manipulation strategies based on the properties of these objects and the environment surrounding them. Most robotic hands developed so far, however, have a fixed and limiting structure; thus, they can perform a limited number of movements and can only grasp specific types of objects.

DESIGNING LAYERED OXIDE MATERIALS FOR SODIUM-ION BATTERIES

Lithium cobalt oxide is a layered metal oxide that has attracted great attention to develop rechargeable batteries. Sodium-ion batteries can store grid-scale energy due to the natural abundance of sodium. The composition can determine the structural chemistry for electrochemical performance, however, due to complex compositions, the results are very challenging to predict. In a new report now on Science, Chenglong Zhao and a team of international scientists at the Chinese Academy of Science, China, Harvard University, U.S., Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands, and the University of Toronto, Canada, introduced a “cationic potential” to capture key interactions of layered materials and predict the resulting stacking structures. The team showed how the stacking architecture determined the functional properties to offer solutions towards developing alkali metal layered oxides for electrical energy storage.

FACEBOOK IS USING AI TO STEM DANGEROUS AND FALSE POSTS

Facebook has come under withering criticism this past year from folks who say the company is not doing enough to stem hate speech, online harassment and the spread of false news stories.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

FOR WAVE-PARTICLE DUALITY AND ENTANGLEMENT, PROGRESS IS FINALLY POSSIBLE IF WE AVOID THE CUSTOMARY PITFALLS

Photon duality remains a paradox because the photon is regarded as a simple, unitary object in space. Equally bad, massless radiation is interpreted via concepts drawn from mass-based physics.

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP WORLD’S FIRST ALL-SILICON OPTICAL TRANSMITTER AT 100GBPS

Silicon photonics researchers from the Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) have demonstrated the first all-silicon optical transmitter at 100Gbps and beyond without the use of digital signal processing.

UNDERSTANDING ASTROPHYSICS WITH LASER-ACCELERATED PROTONS

Bringing huge amounts of protons up to speed in the shortest distance in fractions of a second—that’s what laser acceleration technology, greatly improved in recent years, can do. An international research team from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, in collaboration with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, U.S., has succeeded in using protons accelerated with the GSI high-power laser PHELIX to split other nuclei and to analyze them. The results have now been published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports and could provide new insights into astrophysical processes.

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

STUDY RECONSTRUCTS ANCIENT STORMS TO HELP PREDICT CHANGES IN TROPICAL CYCLONE HOTSPOT

Intense tropical cyclones are expected to become more frequent as climate change increases temperatures in the Pacific Ocean. But not every area will experience storms of the same magnitude. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) published in Nature Geoscience reveals that tropical cyclones were actually more frequent in the southern Marshall Islands during the Little Ice Age, when temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere were cooler than they are today.

FISH CARCASSES DELIVER TOXIC MERCURY POLLUTION TO THE DEEPEST OCEAN TRENCHES

The sinking carcasses of fish from near-surface waters deliver toxic mercury pollution to the most remote and inaccessible parts of the world’s oceans, including the deepest spot of them all: the 36,000-foot-deep Mariana Trench in the northwest Pacific.

NEW PLACEMENT FOR ONE OF EARTH’S LARGEST MASS EXTINCTION EVENTS

Curtin University research has shed new light on when one of the largest mass extinction events on Earth occurred, which gives new meaning to what killed Triassic life and allowed the ecological expansion of dinosaurs in the Jurassic period.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

SPACEX AIMS FOR NIGHT CREW LAUNCH, MUSK SIDELINED BY VIRUS

SpaceX aimed for a Sunday night launch of four astronauts to the International Space Station, although the prospects of good weather were just 50-50 and its leader was sidelined by COVID-19.

SPACEX LAUNCHES FOUR ASTRONAUTS TO ISS

Four astronauts were successfully launched on the SpaceX Crew Dragon “Resilience” to the International Space Station on Sunday, the first of what the US hopes will be many routine missions following a successful test flight in late spring.

MARS IS GETTING A NEW ROBOTIC METEOROLOGIST

Mars is about to get a new stream of weather reports, once NASA’s Perseverance rover touches down on Feb. 18, 2021. As it scours Jezero Crater for signs of ancient microbial life, Perseverance will collect the first planetary samples for return to Earth by a future mission. But the rover will also provide key atmospheric data that will help enable future astronauts to the Red Planet to survive in a world with no breathable oxygen, freezing temperatures, planet wide dust storms, and intense radiation from the sun.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

NEW TECHNOLOGY ALLOWS MORE PRECISE VIEW OF THE SMALLEST NANOPARTICLES

Current state-of-the-art techniques have clear limitations when it comes to imaging the smallest nanoparticles, making it difficult for researchers to study viruses and other structures at the molecular level.

MORE EFFICIENT CONVERSION OF HEAT INTO ELECTRICITY BY TINKERING WITH NANOSTRUCTURE

Thermoelectric materials convert heat into electricity, which makes them extremely attractive for sustainable energy production, especially given that industry can waste more than two-thirds of its energy as heat. But mass production of thermoelectric energy is currently limited by low-energy conversion efficiency. Now, however, researchers Biswanath Dutta and Poulumi Dey of TU Delft’s department of Materials Science and Engineering, have not only been able to explain how nano-structures in thermoelectric materials can improve energy efficiency, but also propose a commercially attractive way to manufacture nano-structured thermoelectric materials, increasing the chances for mass production of thermoelectric energy. Their results were published in Nano Energy.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment