Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 19, 2020.

by OluwaShab

Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 19, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

AN OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR FLYING ROBOTS INSPIRED BY OWLS

When developing robotic systems and computational tools, computer scientists often draw inspiration from animals or other biological systems. Depending on a system’s unique characteristics and purpose, in fact, nature typically offers specific examples of how it could achieve its goals rapidly and effectively.

DISASTER APPS SHARE PERSONAL DATA IN VIOLATION OF THEIR PRIVACY POLICIES

Those in the path of a hurricane or wildfire may use an app to get alerts, communicate with first responders or let loved ones know they are safe. But once the emergency has passed, those apps may still be tracking their location or making personal information available to third parties.

NVIDIA’S LATEST AMPERE 80GB GRAPHICS PROCESSING UNIT BOASTS 2TB MEMORY BANDWIDTH

NVIDA has surpassed the 2 terabyte-per-second memory bandwidth mark with its new GPU, the Santa Clara graphics giant announced Monday.

MACHINE LEARNING GUARANTEES ROBOTS’ PERFORMANCE IN UNKNOWN TERRITORY

A small drone takes a test flight through a space filled with randomly placed cardboard cylinders acting as stand-ins for trees, people or structures. The algorithm controlling the drone has been trained on a thousand simulated obstacle-laden courses, but it’s never seen one like this. Still, nine times out of 10, the pint-sized plane dodges all the obstacles in its path.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

QUANTUM TUNNELING PUSHES THE LIMITS OF SELF-POWERED SENSORS

Shantanu Chakrabartty’s laboratory has been working to create sensors that can run on the least amount of energy. His lab has been so successful at building smaller and more efficient sensors, that they’ve run into a roadblock in the form of a fundamental law of physics.

A NEW WAY TO TACKLE THE NEUTRON LIFETIME ENIGMA: A SUPERFLUID HELIUM-4 SCINTILLATION DETECTOR

A free neutron outside a nucleus is not stable. It undergoes beta decay at a probability. Over time, the number of free neutrons decreases exponentially at a time constant, which is called the neutron lifetime.

TIME TO RETHINK PREDICTING PANDEMIC INFECTION RATES?

During the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, Joseph Lee McCauley, a physics professor at the University of Houston, was watching the daily data for six countries and wondered if infections were really growing exponentially. By extracting the doubling times from the data, he became convinced they were

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

HOLES IN GREENLAND ICE SHEET ARE LARGER THAN PREVIOUSLY THOUGHT, STUDY FINDS

Holes that carry surface meltwater to the base of the Greenland ice sheet, called moulins, are much larger than previously thought, according to a new study based on observation and first-hand exploration by a team including a geologist from the University of Arkansas.

SIMULATIONS SUGGEST GEOENGINEERING WOULD NOT STOP GLOBAL WARMING IF GREENHOUSE GASSES CONTINUE TO INCREASE

A trio of researchers, two with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the other the California Institute of Technology, developed computer simulations suggesting that using geoengineering to cool the planet would not be enough to overcome greenhouse effects if emissions continue at the current rate. Tapio Schneider, Colleen Kaul and Kyle Pressel have published their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

GREENLAND’S LARGEST GLACIERS LIKELY TO MELT FASTER THAN FEARED: STUDY

The three largest glaciers in Greenland—which hold enough frozen water to lift global sea levels some 1.3 metres—could melt faster than even the worst-case warming predictions, research published Tuesday showed.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

ASTRONAUTS BOARD ISS FROM SPACEX’S ‘RESILIENCE’

Four astronauts carried into orbit by a SpaceX Crew Dragon boarded the International Space Station on Tuesday, the first of what NASA hopes will be many routine missions ending US reliance on Russian rockets.

GRAVITATIONAL LENSES MEASURE UNIVERSE EXPANSION

It’s one of the big cosmology debates: The universe is expanding, but how fast exactly? Two available measurements yield different results. Leiden physicist David Harvey adapted an independent third measurement method using the light warping properties of galaxies predicted by Einstein. He published his findings in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

ANCIENT ZIRCON MINERALS FROM MARS REVEAL THE ELUSIVE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF THE RED PLANET

Analysis of an ancient meteorite from Mars suggests that the mineral zircon may be abundant on the surface of the red planet.

GRAVITATIONAL LENSES COULD HOLD THE KEY TO BETTER ESTIMATES OF THE EXPANSION OF THE UNIVERSE

The universe is expanding but astrophysicists aren’t sure exactly how fast that expansion is happening—not because there aren’t answers, but rather because the answers they could give don’t agree.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

MASTERING THE ART OF NANOSCALE CONSTRUCTION TO BREATHE EASY AND BUST FRAUD

Special anti-counterfeiting and chemical sensing tools that we can use with our eyes could be created thanks to a new nanoscale building method.

CONTROLLING MAGNETIZATION DIRECTION OF MAGNETITE AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

Over the last few decades, conventional electronics has been rapidly reaching its technical limits in computing and information technology, calling for innovative devices that go beyond the mere manipulation of electron current. In this regard, spintronics, the study of devices that exploit the “spin” of electrons to perform functions, is one of the hottest areas in applied physics. But, measuring, altering, and, in general, working with this fundamental quantum property is no mean feat.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment