Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 27, 2020.

by OluwaShab


Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 27, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

πŸ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWSπŸ’»πŸ”§πŸ–₯:

TRILLION-TRANSISTOR CHIP BREAKS SPEED RECORD

The biggest computer chip in the world is so fast and powerful it can predict future actions “faster than the laws of physics produce the same result.”

USING FABRIC TO ‘LISTEN’ TO SPACE DUST

Earlier this month a team of MIT researchers sent samples of various high-tech fabrics, some with embedded sensors or electronics, to the International Space Station. The samples (unpowered for now) will be exposed to the space environment for a year in order to determine a baseline for how well these materials survive the harsh environment of low Earth orbit.

‘RULES AS CODE’ WILL LET COMPUTERS APPLY LAWS AND REGULATIONS

Can computers read and apply legal rules? It’s an idea that’s gaining momentum, as it promises to make laws more accessible to the public and easier to follow. But it raises a host of legal, technical and ethical questions.

πŸ—ž PHYSICS NEWSβš™β™¨:

T-RAY TECHNOLOGY REVEALS WHAT’S GETTING UNDER YOUR SKIN

A new method for analyzing the structure of skin using a type of radiation known as T-rays could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer.

PLASMA-DEVELOPED NEW MATERIAL FUNDAMENTAL TO Internet Of Things

QUT Professor Ken Ostrikov from the School of Chemistry and Physics and QUT Centre for Materials Science said the new material could be used to develop new transistor devices for electronics and photodetectors for such applications as fibre-optic communication systems and environmental sensing

πŸ—ž EARTH NEWS🌏:

IRREVERSIBLE HOTTER AND DRIER CLIMATE OVER INNER EAST ASIA

Mongolia’s semi-arid plateau may soon become as barren as parts of the American Southwest due to a “vicious cycle” of heatwaves—that exacerbates soil drying, and ultimately produces more heatwaves—according to an international group of climate scientists.

FIRE AND ICE: NEW DATABASE MAPS AND CLASSIFIES THE DANGERS OF GLACIERIZED VOLCANOES

Destructive volcanic mudflows, huge clouds of volcanic ash that ground flights, and catastrophic floods when natural glacial lake dams fail—these are all examples of the dramatic interactions between volcanoes and glaciers. To help others study, and hopefully predict, dangerous glaciovolcanic activity, researchers have created a new database that combines existing global data.

WORLD IS NOT ON TRACK TO ACHIEVE GLOBAL DEFORESTATION GOALS

Last week, a progress report from the New York Declaration on Forests announced that the world is not on track to meet the declaration’s goals to reduce forest loss and promote sustainable and equitable development. The report identifies lack of transparency as one of the main barriers to progress, and calls for greater involvement of civil society and grassroots movements while planning and implementing large-scale development projects.

πŸ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWSπŸŒͺπŸŽ‡:

ANCIENT EARTH HAD A THICK, TOXIC ATMOSPHERE LIKE VENUS—UNTIL IT COOLED OFF AND BECAME LIVEABLE

Earth is the only planet we know contains life. Is our planet special? Scientists over the years have mulled over what factors are essential for, or beneficial to, life. The answers will help us identify other potentially inhabited planets elsewhere in the galaxy.

EUROPE SIGNS $102M DEAL TO BRING SPACE TRASH HOME

The European Space Agency says it is signing a 86 million-euro ($102 million) contract with a Swiss start-up company to bring a large piece of orbital trash back to Earth.

RAPID-FORMING GIANTS COULD DISRUPT SPIRAL PROTOPLANETARY DISCS

Giant planets that developed early in a star system’s life could solve a mystery of why spiral structures are not observed in young protoplanetary discs, according to a new study by University of Warwick astronomers.

πŸ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSβ›„β˜ƒ:

‘NANOBODIES’ COULD HOLD CLUES TO NEW COVID-19 THERAPIES

WEHI researchers are studying ‘nanobodies’ – tiny immune proteins made by alpacas—in a bid to understand whether they might be effective in blocking SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment