Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 30, 2020.

by OluwaShab


Dear esteem reader,

Here is your SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET customized technology news for November 30, 2020.

Spotlight Stories Headlines

T.P.E.A.N

๐Ÿ—ž TECHNOLOGY NEWS๐Ÿ’ป๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ–ฅ:

SUBSCRIBERS ARE GREAT BENEFICIARIES

The S.T.P urges all to subscribe to the SHAB TECHNOLOGY PLANET YOUTUBE channel for more D.I.Y tech videos,Presentation and more.

#BeTechWise๐Ÿง 

EXPLORING THE USE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN ARCHITECTURE

Over the past few decades, artificial intelligence (AI) tools have been used to analyze data or complete basic tasks in an increasing number of fields, ranging from computer science to manufacturing, medicine, physics, biology and even artistic disciplines. Researchers at University of Michigan have recently been investigating the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in architecture. Their most recent paper, published in the International Journal of Architectural Computing, specifically explores the potential of AI as a tool to create new architectural designs.

AI SYSTEM FINDS, MOVES ITEMS IN CONSTRICTED REGIONS

Artificial intelligence is being applied to virtually every aspect of our work and recreational lives. From determining calculations for the construction of towering skyscrapers to designing and building cruise ships the size of football fields, AI is increasingly playing a key role in the most massive projects.

ELECTRONIC SKIN HAS A STRONG FUTURE STRETCHING AHEAD

A material that mimics human skin in strength, stretchability and sensitivity could be used to collect biological data in real time. Electronic skin, or e-skin, may play an important role in next-generation prosthetics, personalized medicine, soft robotics and artificial intelligence.

๐Ÿ—ž PHYSICS NEWSโš™โ™จ:

A PHOTONIC CRYSTAL COUPLED TO A TRANSMISSION LINE VIA AN ARTIFICIAL ATOM

Researchers have recently displayed the interaction of superconducting qubits; the basic unit of quantum information, with surface acoustic wave resonators; a surface-wave equivalent of the crystal resonator, in quantum physics. This phenomena opens a new field of research, defined as quantum acoustodynamics to allow the development of new types of quantum devices. The main challenge in this venture is to manufacture acoustic resonators in the gigahertz range. In a new report now published on Nature Communications Physics, Aleksey N. Bolgar and a team of physicists in Artificial Quantum Systems and Physics, in Russia and the U.K., detailed the structure of a significantly simplified hybrid acoustodynamic device by replacing an acoustic resonator with a phononic crystal or acoustic metamaterial.

UNPRECEDENTED ACCURACY IN QUANTUM ELECTRODYNAMICS: GIANT LEAP TOWARD SOLVING PROTON CHARGE RADIUS PUZZLE

Physicists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have tested quantum mechanics to a completely new level of precision using hydrogen spectroscopy, and in doing so they came much closer to solving the well-known proton charge radius puzzle.

RESEARCHERS FABRICATE CO-DOPED ALUMINOSILICATE FIBER WITH HIGH LASER STABILITY FOR MULTI-KW LEVEL LASER

Multi-kilowatt (kW) (≥3kW) level fiber lasers with high stability are significant in many applications, and Yb-doped fiber is the key device in such fiber lasers. The incredible advances of the past few decades in fiber fabrication technology have led to an exponential increase in the output power of continuous-wave (CW) fiber lasers. However, with further scaling the output power, photodarkening (PD) was found to be one of the critical limit factors for long-term laser reliability under multi kW level output power.

๐Ÿ—ž EARTH NEWS๐ŸŒ:

MINE PONDS AMPLIFY MERCURY RISKS IN PERU’S AMAZON

The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for small deposits of alluvial gold in Peru’s Amazon has dramatically altered the landscape and increased the risk of mercury exposure for indigenous communities and wildlife, a new study shows.

CLIMATE CHANGE IS MAKING AUTUMN LEAVES CHANGE COLOUR EARLIER—HERE’S WHY

As the days shorten and temperatures drop in the northern hemisphere, leaves begin to turn. We can enjoy glorious autumnal colours while the leaves are still on the trees and, later, kicking through a red, brown and gold carpet when out walking.

SATELLITE IMAGES CONFIRM UNEVEN IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE

University of Copenhagen researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet’s driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades. They have identified a troubling trend: Too little vegetation is sprouting up from rainwater in developing nations, whereas things are headed in the opposite direction in wealthier ones. As a result, the future could see food shortages and growing numbers of climate refugees.

๐Ÿ—ž ASTRONOMY & SPACE NEWS๐ŸŒช๐ŸŽ‡:

THE CASE OF THE MISSING DARK MATTER: NEW SUSPECT FOUND IN GALACTIC MYSTERY

A faraway galaxy with almost no dark matter has threatened to break our theory of galaxy formation. New evidence suggests the galaxy isn’t an anomaly—but a victim of theft.

GALAXY’S BRIGHTEST GAMMA-RAY BINARY SYSTEM MAY BE POWERED BY A MAGNETAR

A team of researchers led by members of the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) has analyzed previously collected data to infer the true nature of a compact object—found to be a rotating magnetar, a type of neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field—orbiting within LS 5039, the brightest gamma-ray binary system in the Galaxy.

EARTH FASTER, CLOSER TO BLACK HOLE IN NEW MAP OF GALAXY

Earth just got 7 km/s faster and about 2000 light-years closer to the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. But don’t worry, this doesn’t mean that our planet is plunging towards the black hole. Instead the changes are results of a better model of the Milky Way Galaxy based on new observation data, including a catalog of objects observed over the course of more than 15 years by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA.

๐Ÿ—ž NANOTECHNOLOGY NEWSโ›„โ˜ƒ:

LANTHANIDE NANOCRYSTALS BRIGHTEN MOLECULAR TRIPLET EXCITONS

NUS scientists have developed an approach to improve the generation and luminescent harvesting of molecular triplets by coupling them with lanthanide-doped nanoparticles. This innovation provides new insights on lanthanide nanocrystal-molecule interaction in the optoelectronic field.

MICROSWIMMERS ARE INANIMATE MICROPARTICLES, BUT THEY MOVE LIKE MOTHS TO THE LIGHT

The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr. Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light. This promising observation and its analysis was recently published in the scientific journal Soft Matter as an “Emerging Investigator” article.

GRAPHENE BALLOONS TO IDENTIFY NOBLE GASES

New research by scientists from Delft University of Technology and the University of Duisburg-Essen uses the motion of atomically thin graphene to identify noble gasses. These gasses are chemically passive and do not react with other materials, which makes it challenging to detect them. The findings are reported in the journal Nature Communications.

enquires:shabtechnologyplanet@gmail.com
Source:Technology News Channels
All right reserved©2019

You may also like

Leave a Comment